What is the SDF course

TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network offer the SDF course also known as the Skills Development Facilitator Course both online through elearning and classroom sessions. For pricing and bookings please visit www.coursesdirect.co.za or read the full course detail of the SDF course here.

What Is The Role Of An SDF?

SDFs shave many functions within the skills and development space; these include:

  • Assisting employers and employees in developing their workplace skills plan (WSP)
  • Submitting the WSP to the relevant SETA
  • Advising an employer on the implementation of their WSP.
  • Guiding the employer on how to implement the WSP.
  • Helping the employer to draft an annual training report on the WSP.
  • Advising on the quality assurance requirements set out by the SETA.
  • Acting as a contact person/liaison between the employer and the relevant SETA.
  • Serving as a skills development resource.
  • Conducts a Skills Audit in your workplace.
  • Assist in the alignment of skills against the National Qualification Framework
  • Source the correct Training Provider

Who can be appointed as a SDF?

In larger organisations, a currently employed training or Human Resource (HR) manager may take up the role of an internal SDF. In smaller organisations there is often no dedicated training or HR professional fulfilling that role, and so a manager or company owner will assume the responsibility. The role can also be outsourced to a professional external SDF.

The SDF is a fundamental and integral part of the company’s skills development and training process in that it is that person’s role to ensure that not only the submissions are submitted but also to ensure that the training that is provided is done in such a way as to maximise the company’s grant application, meets the criteria for the employee as well as the company’s objectives, vision and mission and supports the growth of the company and its employees in a holistic way, within legislative requires.

Which companies should appoint an SDF?

As per the Skills Development Levies Act, all employers of organisations that are registered for skills development levy purposes with SARS have to appoint an SDF who must co-ordinate all skills related activities of an organisation.

What are the roles of an SDF?

The employer must provide the SDF with resources, facilities and training necessary to perform the functions set out above.

Roles of an SDF:

  • Facilitator: To facilitate the development of an employer’s skills development strategy
  • Expert: To serve as an expert resource for accrediting the employer as a training provider and for the implementation of appropriate learnerships and skills programmes.
  • Administrator: To complete and submit the
  • Advisor: To advise the employers and employees on the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and on the implementation of the WSP
  • Education and needs evaluator: To assess the skills development needs of the organisation
  • Mediator: To serve as a contact person between the employer and the relevant Seta

115753 Conduct outcomes-based assessment

Why the Assessors Course?

Assessors are the glue which holds the learner and the end-result together.  Continued professional development is important in order to improve the skills and knowledge that you have.

They evaluate the skills and competencies demonstrated and provided by the learner and directly engage in providing constructive feedback by means of support and remediation to ensure the learner understands what it takes to reach the desired learning outcome.

They are great decision-makers and judges and are intuitively built and trained to ensure and see to it that learners are learnt and trained adequately. The varied role of an Assessor will mean that no two days will be the same. Whether you are recording achievements, running through evidence or marking work, you will soon develop a wide range of skills. You will be regularly communicating with your learners, and time management is also important when running your own diary.

In order to become an Assessor, you need both an Assessor course 115753 and occupational competence through TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network.

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD
This generic assessor course Assessors Course is for those who assess people for their achievement of learning outcomes in terms of specified criteria using pre-designed assessment instruments. The outcomes and criteria of the assessors course may be defined in a range of documents including but not limited to Assessors Courses, exit level outcomes, assessment standards, curriculum statements and qualifications.

Those who achieve this assessors course will be able to conduct assessments within their fields of expertise. This assessors course will contribute towards the achievement of a variety of qualifications, particularly within the fields of Education Training and Development Practices and Human Resource Development.

People credited with this assessors course are able to carry out assessments in a fair, valid, reliable and practicable manner that is free of all bias and discrimination, paying particular attention to the three groups targeted for redress: race, gender and disability.

In particular, people credited with this Assessors Course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of outcomes-based assessment;
  • Prepare for assessments;
  • Conduct assessments;
  • Provide feedback on assessments; and
  • Review assessments.

115753 Assessor Course

Importance of the SDF course

TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network offer the SDF course also known as the Skills Development Facilitator Course both online through elearning and classroom sessions. For pricing and bookings please visit www.coursesdirect.co.za or read the full course detail of the SDF course here.

What Is A Skills Development Facilitator?

Firstly, what exactly is a Skills Development Facilitator (SDF)?

An SDF is an individual who works to ensure that your company’s Workplace Skills Plan/Implementation Report is developed and implemented, while also serving as a liaison between you and your SETA.

SDF’s who study the unit standards advocated would be more qualified to complete the functions of a professional SDF which I believe should be recognised by HR practitioners as  

  • Advising on and implementation of Quality management Systems for skills development
  • Conducting analysis to determine outcomes of training
  • Conducting skills development administration
  • Coordinating skills development interventions
  • Utilising their skills in advising others on outcomes based education within the context of the NQF
  • Developing the organisations training and development plans

A Skills Development Facilitator (SDF) is responsible for the planning, implementations and reporting of training in an organisation, with SETA related duties.    The function of your SDF, be it an internal SDF, and external (outsourced) SDF or Secondary SDF (Union representative elected to assist with the submission of the grant) is to assist the company with developing and executing the WSP and submitting it to the SETA during the grant submission reporting period. In conjunction the SDF must report on the ATR for the past year which is also submitting during the reporting season.

What do SDF’s do?

SDF’s work out what the training gaps are in an organisation’s workforce. They then draw up training plans to address those gaps. They consult and advise on all aspects of people development. They interact with appropriate authorities (Seta’s) and claim back cash (grants) for training.

Assisting Workplaces in Developing a Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)

A WSP is a document in which a company’s skills needs and the various skills development interventions needed to address these needs are listed.

Your SDF should develop and submit a yearly WSP to comply with the current Skills Development legislation in South Africa. A qualified and experienced SDF should do this.

By complying with these requirements, a company can access numerous skills training SETA grants. Yet, to qualify, your company will also have to submit your Annual Training Reports (ATR).

Roles of an SDF:

  • Facilitator: To facilitate the development of an employer’s skills development strategy
  • Expert: To serve as an expert resource for accrediting the employer as a training provider and for the implementation of appropriate learnerships and skills programmes.
  • Administrator: To complete and submit the
  • Advisor: To advise the employers and employees on the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and on the implementation of the WSP
  • Education and needs evaluator: To assess the skills development needs of the organisation
  • Mediator: To serve as a contact person between the employer and the relevant Seta

Does an SDF need to be registered?

A Skills Development Facilitator must be registered with the relevant SETA. The SDF can perform these duties for more than one employer, but must be registered for every employer at the same or at a different SETA. Although SDF’s are not required to have any formal qualifications to register, organisations will normally appoint a SDF who has an ETD qualification.

Assessors Course

Introduction to the Assessors Course.

In order to become an Assessor, you need both an Assessor course 115753 and occupational competence through TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network.

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD
This generic Assessors Course is for those who assess people for their achievement of learning outcomes in terms of specified criteria using pre-designed assessment instruments. The outcomes and criteria of the assessors course may be defined in a range of documents including but not limited to Assessors Courses, exit level outcomes, assessment standards, curriculum statements and qualifications.

Those who achieve this assessors course will be able to conduct assessments within their fields of expertise. This assessors course will contribute towards the achievement of a variety of qualifications, particularly within the fields of Education Training and Development Practices and Human Resource Development. Continued professional development is important in order to improve the skills and knowledge that you have.

People credited with this assessors course are able to carry out assessments in a fair, valid, reliable and practicable manner that is free of all bias and discrimination, paying particular attention to the three groups targeted for redress: race, gender and disability.

In particular, people credited with this Assessors Course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of outcomes-based assessment;
  • Prepare for assessments;
  • Conduct assessments;
  • Provide feedback on assessments; and
  • Review assessments.

They are responsible for making a decision if a learner is competent or not yet competent in a specific topic or learning objective. The varied role of an Assessor will mean that no two days will be the same. Whether you are recording achievements, running through evidence or marking work, you will soon develop a wide range of skills. You will be regularly communicating with your learners, and time management is also important when running your own diary.

They are great decision-makers and judges and are intuitively built and trained to ensure and see to it that learners are learnt and trained adequately.

They evaluate the skills and competencies demonstrated and provided by the learner and directly engage in providing constructive feedback by means of support and remediation to ensure the learner understands what it takes to reach the desired learning outcome.

Assessors are the glue which holds the learner and the end-result together.

115753 Assessor Course

Importance of the facilitator course

TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network in South Africa who also offer the Train the Trainer Course also known as Facilitator course is aimed to accredit you as the Trainer or Facilitator to be SETA certified that is also nationally and internationally recognised by most countries.

Facilitators often teach courses that require reflection and application of information to a job, such as communications, leadership, problem-solving, and more.

Good facilitation helps a group achieve your purpose by hearing each other, coming to understandings, pooling your wisdom and making wise decisions. The facilitator focuses on both purpose and process. The purpose is what the group has agreed to discuss or make a decision around.

The facilitator’s job is to support everyone to do their best thinking. They create an environment where everyone is encouraged to participate, understand one another’s point of view and share responsibility.

Conflict can help teams and organisations to take an innovative approach to products, services, processes and solutions.

Facilitation skills are the abilities you use to provide opportunities and resources to a group of people that enable them to make progress and succeed. Some examples include being prepared, setting guidelines, being flexible, active listening and managing time.

Why is Facilitation Important? Facilitation is important because meetings of large groups of people can be very hard to organize as well as to control when they are in progress. First of all, a facilitator can help members of a group get to know each other and learn to cooperate.

117871 Train the Trainer Course

What is the SDF course

What Is The Role Of An SDF?

SDFs shave many functions within the skills and development space; these include:

  • Assisting employers and employees in developing their workplace skills plan (WSP)
  • Submitting the WSP to the relevant SETA
  • Advising an employer on the implementation of their WSP.
  • Guiding the employer on how to implement the WSP.
  • Helping the employer to draft an annual training report on the WSP.
  • Advising on the quality assurance requirements set out by the SETA.
  • Acting as a contact person/liaison between the employer and the relevant SETA.
  • Serving as a skills development resource.
  • Conducts a Skills Audit in your workplace.
  • Assist in the alignment of skills against the National Qualification Framework
  • Source the correct Training Provider

What are the roles of an SDF?

The employer must provide the SDF with resources, facilities and training necessary to perform the functions set out above.

A Skills Development Facilitator (SDF) is responsible for the planning, implementations and reporting of training in an organisation, with SETA related duties.    The function of your SDF, be it an internal SDF, and external (outsourced) SDF or Secondary SDF (Union representative elected to assist with the submission of the grant) is to assist the company with developing and executing the WSP and submitting it to the SETA during the grant submission reporting period. In conjunction the SDF must report on the ATR for the past year which is also submitting during the reporting season.

Roles of an SDF:

  • Facilitator: To facilitate the development of an employer’s skills development strategy
  • Expert: To serve as an expert resource for accrediting the employer as a training provider and for the implementation of appropriate learnerships and skills programmes.
  • Administrator: To complete and submit the
  • Advisor: To advise the employers and employees on the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) and on the implementation of the WSP
  • Education and needs evaluator: To assess the skills development needs of the organisation
  • Mediator: To serve as a contact person between the employer and the relevant Seta

Does an SDF need to be registered?

A Skills Development Facilitator must be registered with the relevant SETA. The SDF can perform these duties for more than one employer, but must be registered for every employer at the same or at a different SETA. Although SDF’s are not required to have any formal qualifications to register, organisations will normally appoint a SDF who has an ETD qualification.

Who can be appointed as a SDF?

In larger organisations, a currently employed training or Human Resource (HR) manager may take up the role of an internal SDF. In smaller organisations there is often no dedicated training or HR professional fulfilling that role, and so a manager or company owner will assume the responsibility. The role can also be outsourced to a professional external SDF.

TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network offer the SDF course also known as the Skills Development Facilitator Course both online through elearning and classroom sessions. For pricing and bookings please visit www.coursesdirect.co.za or read the full course detail of the SDF course here.

The facilitator course introduction

TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network in South Africa who also offer the Train the Trainer Course also known as Facilitator course is aimed to accredit you as the Trainer or Facilitator to be SETA certified that is also nationally and internationally recognised by most countries.

Good facilitation helps a group achieve your purpose by hearing each other, coming to understandings, pooling your wisdom and making wise decisions. The facilitator focuses on both purpose and process. The purpose is what the group has agreed to discuss or make a decision around.

Conflict is a natural part of working in a team. While conflict may at first seem destructive and may not feel very comfortable, it can be creative.

The facilitator’s job is to support everyone to do their best thinking. They create an environment where everyone is encouraged to participate, understand one another’s point of view and share responsibility.

Facilitation skills are the abilities you use to provide opportunities and resources to a group of people that enable them to make progress and succeed. Some examples include being prepared, setting guidelines, being flexible, active listening and managing time.

Why is Facilitation Important? Facilitation is important because meetings of large groups of people can be very hard to organize as well as to control when they are in progress. First of all, a facilitator can help members of a group get to know each other and learn to cooperate.

Facilitators often teach courses that require reflection and application of information to a job, such as communications, leadership, problem-solving, and more.

117871 Train the Trainer Course

115753 Conduct outcomes-based assessment

Why the Assessors Course?

They are responsible for making a decision if a learner is competent or not yet competent in a specific topic or learning objective.

Assessors are the glue which holds the learner and the end-result together. The varied role of an Assessor will mean that no two days will be the same. Whether you are recording achievements, running through evidence or marking work, you will soon develop a wide range of skills. You will be regularly communicating with your learners, and time management is also important when running your own diary.

They are great decision-makers and judges and are intuitively built and trained to ensure and see to it that learners are learnt and trained adequately.

They evaluate the skills and competencies demonstrated and provided by the learner and directly engage in providing constructive feedback by means of support and remediation to ensure the learner understands what it takes to reach the desired learning outcome.

In order to become an Assessor, you need both an Assessor course 115753 and occupational competence through TrainYouCan Accredited Training Network.

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD
This generic a Assessors Course is for those who assess people for their achievement of learning outcomes in terms of specified criteria using pre-designed assessment instruments. The outcomes and criteria of the assessors course may be defined in a range of documents including but not limited to Assessors Courses, exit level outcomes, assessment standards, curriculum statements and qualifications.

Those who achieve this assessors course will be able to conduct assessments within their fields of expertise. This assessors course will contribute towards the achievement of a variety of qualifications, particularly within the fields of Education Training and Development Practices and Human Resource Development. Continued professional development is important in order to improve the skills and knowledge that you have.

People credited with this assessors course are able to carry out assessments in a fair, valid, reliable and practicable manner that is free of all bias and discrimination, paying particular attention to the three groups targeted for redress: race, gender and disability.

In particular, people credited with this Assessors Course will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of outcomes-based assessment;
  • Prepare for assessments;
  • Conduct assessments;
  • Provide feedback on assessments; and
  • Review assessments.

115753 Assessor Course

Learning facilitation

What are these qualities? What are the behaviours?

Lets’ start with the behaviours, or skills, if you like. This is what facilitators do when with a group…

  • Challenge habitual thinking and behaviour
  • Hold space
  • Model behaviours
  • Notice and reflect back
  • Look for opportunities to get out of the way

Do I hear a how? How do facilitators do all of this? By…

  • Selecting appropriate activities and processes
  • Providing a suitable environment/space
  • Keeping track of time and progress
  • Clarifying, questioning, sometimes challenging and summarising
  • Being non-partisan, not taking sides, not having pre-determined answers/outcomes
  • Ensuring the group does the work
  • Ensuring that the group’s work is captured, when necessary (which implies knowing when that is)

Hmmm….Is that all there is to facilitating? What distinguishes pedestrian facilitation from great facilitation?

Maybe it’s the personal qualities, or attitudes, that facilitators bring…

  • Humility
  • Empathy
  • Bravery and a willingness to fail gracefully
  • Playfulness
  • Presence
  • Curiosity
  • Flexibility
  • Responsiveness

If I’m learning to be a facilitator, I probably want to learn the how (processes, techniques, tip and tricks) first. Then I’d want to know about application, when and why I would use one and not the other. Problem is, learning is not linear. It happens in loops and leaps, in small moments of clarity, in confusion and messiness. In other words, learning, and meaning, emerges. It can’t be structured in a way that makes sense to everyone because everyone learns differently (and no, I’m not thinking learning styles – that’s been well and truly debunked).

Here’s the dilemma. While learning is non-linear, the training is. It starts on Monday, finishes on Friday. Each day has a start and an end. We progress from one day to the next. Doing what? There’s no end of choices really.

It’s the curse of the agenda: in advance, we’ll decide we’ll do this, then that, then something else. I don’t know until I’m in the room with the group what the group really needs. The group becomes its own learning laboratory – it has within it all the complexity and messiness of any group of humans. It comes down to the curse of planning. We have the ability to think ahead, to plan what we’ll do. In many cases that’s a sensible thing to do. If I have to catch a plane I need to plan when to get to the airport, and make sure I go to the right airport. The consequences of not planning are pretty clear. I can apply the same thinking to working with a group of people. I can plan certain things – when we’ll start, when we’ll finish, where we will meet, when we will break for lunch, why we are meeting. It’s harder to plan for what might happen with a group of people, especially once I use a process that is participatory. If I follow a plan meticulously, I might miss some opportunity, or something important. If I have no plan at all…

I’ll need to draw on my ability to be spontaneous and improvise, to use what’s available (including the people in the room) combined with my own skills and knowledge of facilitation.

If an agenda is not so helpful, what is? Learning outcomes? At the end of this training, you will be able to…will understand…will know… Hmmm… There might be a shift towards these things. Learning may happen during the training. Most likely it won’t. It might happen next time one of them is in front of a group. Who am I to determine what learning you need? Nope, learning outcomes don’t help me.

In the end I need to do what I usually do – start somewhere, see what happens. Notice. Respond. Do something else. Explain what I’m doing and why. Provide opportunities to experience different approaches (processes) – not just watch, actually be a part of them, exploring topics that illuminate even more about working with groups. I need to be prepared for a number of possible approaches and to offer a rich and diverse, human, experience that enables people to learn at their own pace, to struggle in their own way, to allow meaning and insight to emerge by providing space and opportunities for them to make their own meaning, rather than me impose my meaning.

The topic of facilitation is so large, I need some anchors, some boundaries: time is one (a one-day course is very different from a five-day course); the participants and their current level of understanding is another (I won’t know that until I work with them). Briefing from the client? Can be unreliable, especially if they’re not sure themselves what they want. Facilitation principles? Too abstract. Qualities of a facilitator? Too obscure.

117871 Train the Trainer Course

South Africa Training Providers Forum

The South Africa Training Providers Forum was established to assist training providers (private and public) as “a voice” in the Higher Education domain. Our aim is not to replace any current bodies or excising forums, but to target a specific audience in the Training industry that is in a much needed space for support and resources.

The Training Providers Forum in South Africa want to bring the much needed resources to the Training Providers directly through innovative technology delivery methods and represent them as the training voice in the Higher Education sector.

The South Africa Training Providers Forum aim to deliver the following services to the industry:

  1. Be the voice about national issues in South Africa with the various SETAs and the QCTO.
  2. Aim to bring business leads to the Training Industry.
  3. Provide a forum for discussions and sharing of knowledge.
  4. Provide free webinars and virtual training sessions to its members.

With very affordable rates to become a member of the Training Providers Forum makes it one of the best option for upcoming Training Provider in South Africa.

The South Africa Training Providers Forum is a registered Non-profit Company.

http://trainingforum.org.za/