How to select a Training Provider

First the fear of signing up with a “bogus” provider, then the fear of not getting the required support is probably something we all think of when booking for a course.

Let’s face it: Training is expensive, and waiting for your money from the wrong provider or course could leave to devastating consciences, especially if you bargain on getting future employment.

Below is some of our general guidelines when selecting a Training Provider. It always helps to do a bit of research.

How to select a Training Provider:
• Ask for references.
• Look at the Facilitators CV for experience.
• Type of support provided.
• Duration and if support is limited to a period.
• Type of assessments.
• Type of Certification (Attendance or Competence.)

How to confirm a Training Institution is Accredited:
• Ask for their Accreditation Number.
• Ask for the SETA they accredited with.
• DO NOT accept their accreditation letter. Contact the SETA direction to confirm their scope.
• Ensure legislated terminology, like “we are SETA Accredited”, and not only using the word “Accredited” on its own.
• Check that the programme accreditation is valid by phoning the SETA. (Different from Training Provider Accreditation.)

What should reflect on a course marketing material:
• Unit Standard Number.
• NQF Level
• Credits
• Expiry date
• Entry level requirements.

Guidelines for signing agreements with external providers:
• Payment terms.
• Type of Support provided.
• Duration, time frames.
• Type of methodologies that will be used.
• Content of the course.
• How will re-assessments be handled.
• What is the cost of cancellation?
• What is the cost of learning that must be re-scheduled?
• What are the registration fees and is it refundable?
• Previous references?

Guidelines with registration/enrolments:
• Many institution ask for a registration fee that is not refundable. Note that the SETAs and the QCTO does not ask a fee to be registered and there is merely an admin fee for the institution to register you on their database.
• Some use the registration fee as a “founders fee” for any person who referred or found them the client. That also explains why the fee is never refundable.
• Many providers limit their access to a course content or final submissions to a set period. After this you will be expected to pay-up and in some cases even to re-book for the entire course. Strict deadline clauses should be clearly indicated on their registration forms. It is advisable to always keep a copy of their advertising material and your enrolment details should you want to log a dispute with the relevant SETA.

Provided by TrainYouCan PTY LTD

Become SETA Accredited Training Provider

Accreditation

Accreditation is the certification, usually for a particular period of time, of a person, body or institution as having the capacity to fulfill a particular function within the quality assurance system set up by South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

Training Provider

A provider is an education and training body (institution/organisation, company, centre, collaborative partnership, or consultancy) which delivers learning programmes that culminate in specified National Qualifications Framework (NQF) standards or qualifications.

Getting accreditation

“With the type of training school you want to provide you would need to contact Services Seta to apply for accreditation”.  The Seta’s website offer a user-friendly website that covers both general areas as well as information specific to employers, training providers and learners.

How to register a training college

The most important body that you have to comply with is the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA). SAQA controls the comprehensive education system approved by the Minister of Education for the classification, registration, publication and articulation of quality-assured national qualifications.

SAQA

As a provider of training for the Information Technology sector, regulations are listed under the category “Seta ISETT”.

Criteria for accreditation

SAQA require that you show that you have necessary financial, administrative and physical resources to operate the college. You will have to have policies and practices for staff selection, appraisal and development.

SAQA will also need you to have in place the correct policies and practices for learner entry and you will have to show how you intend to achieve the desired outcomes using the procedures recommended by SAQA in order to teach students so that they receive an accredited qualification.

Contact SAQA who will explain in detail how to achieve the specified regulations and standards in order to be granted accreditation so you can operate a registered and respected training college.

ACCREDITATION

SETA Accredited Training Provider

The main steps in the accreditation process to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

  1. The Training Provider determines the primary focus
  2. The SETA Quality Assurance Management Division requirements are compiled by the provider
  3. The Training Provider completes and submits an online application form for accreditation
  4. A compliance check is conducted by SETA and the provider receives a notification of compliance / non-compliance
  5. The Training Provider responds to the notification if necessary
  6. A site visit is scheduled and conducted by a SETA ETQA evaluator
  7. The evaluator sends his/her report to SETA
  8. The evaluation report is quality assured and the report indicating the status of accreditation is sent to the provider. Where applicable, areas of remediation will be detailed in the report.
  9. The Training Provider is required to respond to areas of remediation if necessary, and make the relevant submission.
  10. Confirm registration with the DHET

Providers of education and training must apply for accreditation with an Education and Training Quality Assurance (ETQA) body under the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)(link is external). All providers of education and training offering full qualifications must be registered with the Department of Education.

The education and training provider has to offer unit standards and/or qualifications that fall within the primary focus area of the ETQA body of the relevant Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA)(link is external) or professional body.

Requirements for accreditation:

  • The programmes (and/or assessments) offered by the education and training provider must culminate in unit standards and/or qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).
  • The curriculum (design, content and learning materials) is aligned to the unit standards and/or qualifications.
  • There are suitably qualified staff (facilitators and registered assessors).
  • The learners have access to adequate learning support services.
  • The assessment methods and tools used to measure the requirements for the unit standard and/or qualification are fair, valid and reliable, and are used to enhance learning.

Provider Accreditation with an ETQA can often be a daunting process, best left to the professionals.

SETA Accreditation Services offers ETD Providers a fully encompassing accreditation service and/or guidance with the process.

Having in excess of 30 years HR, Labour Relations, Training, Development and Education as well as Administration experience and knowledge, we have the generalist and specialist knowledge required to streamline the Accreditation process and ensure that Providers are accredited by their relevant ETQA as effectively and efficiently as possible, with little or no fuss to the Provider.

Take a moment to look at our site, send us an e-mail or call us, and we will set up a meeting with you to get the process started.

Requirements to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

The document Criteria and Guidelines to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider sets out the requirements for accreditation.

  • The programmes (and/or assessments) offered by the education and training provider must culminate in unit standards and/or qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).
  • The curriculum (design, content and learning materials) is aligned to the unit standards and/or qualifications.
  • There are suitably qualified staff (facilitators and registered assessors).
  • The learners have access to adequate learning support services.
  • The assessment methods and tools used to measure the requirements for the unit standard and/or qualification are fair, valid and reliable, and are used to enhance learning.

Things to keep in mind when choosing a training provider

Things to keep in mind when choosing a training provider

1. Find a reputable partner
When you’re evaluating training providers, take the time to investigate their reputation in the market. Ask each provider you are considering for some reference sites, and be sure to contact them to find out about their experiences. This will take five minutes of your time, but may save you thousands in training costs.

 

2. Choose a specialist
Find out which trainers will be responsible for delivering the training on the courses you are considering, and evaluate their expertise and qualifications in the subject matter. Someone with a strong, proven theoretical grounding is good; a trainer with practical experience in the field is even better because he or she will be able to talk about real-life situations.

3. Fulfil specific training needs
Training is expensive, so be sure you know what outcome you expect from your investment in a course or workshop for an employee. Look closely at the course overview and determine beforehand if it will fulfil your need.

If you are choosing training on behalf of your employee, discuss the expected outcome with him or her. Ask the provider for a detailed course outline and discuss how each topic on the list will cover the employee’s training need with him or her before the course commences.

4. Look at the take home value
It’s not enough for the training course to deliver practical skills and knowledge that the employee can apply as soon as he or she returns to the office – it must also offer value in the materials the employee gets to take away from the sessions.

Researchers reckon that you remember less than 20% of what you learn during a training intervention. For that reason, a course’s value is vastly increased when the employee leaves with reference manuals, online support, and other such tools and materials.

5. Assessing the learner
The topic of assessments can be controversial. Some people believe they unsettle the learner, while others believe that they’re essential to the learning process. Whichever side of the fence you sit on, choose a provider that aligns with your needs.

SETA Accredited Training Provider

Accreditation

Accreditation means the certification, usually for a particular period of time, of a person, a body or an institution as having the capacity to fulfill a particular function in the quality assurance system set up by the South African Qualifications Authority in terms of the Act.

The main steps in the accreditation process to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

  1. The Training Provider determines the primary focus
  2. The SETA Quality Assurance Management Division requirements are compiled by the provider
  3. The Training Provider completes and submits an online application form for accreditation
  4. A compliance check is conducted by SETA and the provider receives a notification of compliance / non-compliance
  5. The Training Provider responds to the notification if necessary
  6. A site visit is scheduled and conducted by a SETA ETQA evaluator
  7. The evaluator sends his/her report to SETA
  8. The evaluation report is quality assured and the report indicating the status of accreditation is sent to the provider. Where applicable, areas of remediation will be detailed in the report.
  9. The Training Provider is required to respond to areas of remediation if necessary, and make the relevant submission.
  10. Confirm registration with the DHET

Accreditation Explained

Umalusi accredits private providers of education and training as well as private assessment bodies to offer tuition and/or assessment for qualification(s) on the General and Further Education and Training Qualifications Sub-Framework (GFETQSF).

This means that Umalusi accredits the following institutions:

  • Independent schools;
  • Private Further Education and Training Colleges (FET Colleges);
  • Private Adult Education and Training providers;
  • Private assessment bodies that assess the qualifications Umalusi certifies.

In accrediting institutions Umalusi is guided by policy documents that contain criteria for accreditation for each institutional type.

Umalusi does not accredit public providers.

Instead, Umalusi monitors and reports on the quality of the qualifications and curricula used in public schools, TVET colleges and Adult Learning Centres, and externally monitors the national assessment system.

Full Qualification:

Accreditation is for training providers wishing to deliver and assess qualifications that fall within Fasset’s scope of delegated quality assurance. The majority of finance and accounting qualifications no longer form part of our scope, and provider accreditation for those qualifications is the direct responsibility of the assigned professional body, see the table below.

Both Fasset and the professional bodies are QCTO Quality Assurance Partners (QAPs) responsible for certain quality assurance functions associated with stipulated qualifications. Please consult the table below to identify the QAP responsible for provider accreditation for the qualification of your interest. Each QAP has its own accreditation criteria, process and form, and providers need to liaise with the relevant body directly.

Applicant Providers should first send a letter of intent to the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO), intent template can be sourced from the QCTO website.

Accredited Training Provider

What is the purpose of SETA Accreditation?

The purpose of SETA accreditation is to make sure that education and training is of a high standard and quality and that it is relevant to the needs of the industry sector in question. If a training provider has SETA accreditation, it means that the training provider’s courses comply with the NQF standards, and that the courses offered have been evaluated to ensure that they are in line with these standards. SETA accreditation also aims to ensure that there is uniformity of similar courses offered by different training providers. SETA accreditation therefore provides the assurance that a training provider will be capable of providing relevant training and education that is in line with national standards. Another purpose of SETA accreditation is to ensure that the courses being offered by accredited training providers are relevant to industry needs and will equip students with the skills that they will need in the workplace.

Accreditation is granted to a skills development provider following a quality assurance process that demonstrates the quality of training offered by that training provider.

There are a number of reasons for a company or a learner to use an accredited training provider for skills development requirements.

  • You can be assured that the quality of training you will receive is of high standard and that the training provider is not a fly-by-night institution.
  • You can be assured the courses offered are SETA approved, meaning the training programmes provided are according to the standards set out in the relevant National Qualifications Framework (NQF) legislation
  • When completing your BEE scorecard, you can claim points against your training expenditure
  • It is one of the qualification criteria for SETA grants and SARS tax rebates
  • Qualifications obtained from an accredited service provider is a recognised qualification

You can search whether a training provider is accredited with the Services SETA. Please note that only training providers accredited to deliver our Services SETA qualifications will be on this database.

What is SETA accreditation?

According to the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA), accreditation means that a person, a body or an institution has been certified as “having the capacity to fulfill a particular function in the quality assurance system set up by the South African Qualifications Authority.”

SETA accreditation can only be attained by a training provider if it successfully completes the stringent application process prescribed by a relevant SETA. SETA accreditation is therefore the result of a process whereby a SETA determines whether a training provider has the necessary capacity and ability to provide quality training in line with National Qualifications Framework (NQF) standards.

How does SETA accreditation benefit students?

If a student completes a SETA accredited course through a training provider that has SETA accreditation, the student can earn the appropriate NQF credits. NQF credits can count towards full qualifications that are recognized throughout South Africa.  In other words, SETA accreditation means that a course or qualification can be formally recognized. This is of benefit to the student, as employers in certain sectors often require their employees to have formal qualifications. Formal recognition is also beneficial to students who wish to change from one course to another without having to repeat subjects or courses that they may already have completed.

SETA accreditation is also an indication to students that a training provider is reputable, and not a fly-by-night institution. Another benefit of SETA accreditation is that it assures students that they will be receiving training that they will be able to apply in the workplace and that they will be equipped with skills that are sought after by employers within the particular industry sector.

What does it mean to be a SETA accredited training provider?

A Services SETA accredited training provider is a training provider that offers courses and/or qualifications within the services industry and that are in line with the relevant standards of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). This means that the provider has successfully gone through the stringent accreditation process set out by the Services SETA. Due to the SETA “stamp of approval”, Services SETA accredited providers are relied on to provide high quality, industry-relevant training and education within the services sector. Training received through a Services SETA accredited provider is also formally recognized throughout South Africa.

CHOOSING AN EXTERNAL TRAINING PROVIDER

The benefits of external training providers are numerous, they handle the certification of their trainers, they organise the course materials and they liaise with participants throughout the process. But how do you know that you’ve chosen a good provider?
We’ve put together our top 5 tips below to help you pick a good external training provider for your organisation.

1. Check their track record
An external training provider’s track record is a good indicator of their compatibility with your business. Have they worked with an organisation like yours in the past? Contact that company and find out how the training went. You should also consider checking the credentials of their trainers; look for relevant experience and customer references. Any provider worth your time will understand why this information is important and will happily share it.

2. Check if they offer customised or off the shelf training
Off the shelf training has a bad reputation but if you need it to meet mandatory legal obligations then it makes sense that the training would not need to be customised. However, a provider that only offers off the shelf training packages might not be the best fit for your organisation. The best providers understand the need to offer both and are willing to customise training based on your requirements.

3. Check their financial history
This can be a sensitive issue but it is important to protect your company. By checking the financial history of an external training provider, you can ensure they won’t take your money and disappear. Before paying any money to a provider, you should ask about their financial situation and what will happen if their company is unable to provide the training.

4. Ask about support
Most training courses don’t end as soon as the instructor stops talking. You want there to be a period following the training where your staff receive regular support to ensure they have truly achieved the learning objectives. A good external training provider will have clearly defined support terms and offer add-on packages to ensure that your staff are comfortable after the training.

5. Check their training methods
People tend to learn very differently and a good external training provider will know and accommodate this. Ask a potential provider what their training methods are and see if they are using methods that are innovative and based on sound research. A good provider will be able to clearly explain their training methods and how they help achieve the desired learning objectives.

CHOOSING AN EXTERNAL TRAINING PROVIDER

CHOOSING AN EXTERNAL TRAINING PROVIDER

1. Check their track record
An external training provider’s track record is a good indicator of their compatibility with your business. Have they worked with an organisation like yours in the past? Contact that company and find out how the training went. You should also consider checking the credentials of their trainers; look for relevant experience and customer references. Any provider worth your time will understand why this information is important and will happily share it.

2. Check if they offer customised or off the shelf training
Off the shelf training has a bad reputation but if you need it to meet mandatory legal obligations then it makes sense that the training would not need to be customised. However, a provider that only offers off the shelf training packages might not be the best fit for your organisation. The best providers understand the need to offer both and are willing to customise training based on your requirements.

3. Check their financial history
This can be a sensitive issue but it is important to protect your company. By checking the financial history of an external training provider, you can ensure they won’t take your money and disappear. Before paying any money to a provider, you should ask about their financial situation and what will happen if their company is unable to provide the training.

4. Ask about support
Most training courses don’t end as soon as the instructor stops talking. You want there to be a period following the training where your staff receive regular support to ensure they have truly achieved the learning objectives. A good external training provider will have clearly defined support terms and offer add-on packages to ensure that your staff are comfortable after the training.

5. Check their training methods
People tend to learn very differently and a good external training provider will know and accommodate this. Ask a potential provider what their training methods are and see if they are using methods that are innovative and based on sound research. A good provider will be able to clearly explain their training methods and how they help achieve the desired learning objectives.

How to Find the Best Training Provider

How to Find the Best Training Provider

Develop a short list of providers

Remember, selecting a training provider is a formal procurement process just like any other, which means you should follow corporate buying best practice: research and compare the market and get quotes from a selection of providers, typically two to four.

2. Develop a detailed request for proposal

Clearly specify your training needs, e.g. how many trainees, what type of skills, location, preferred style of delivery, and also establish your training outcomes. You can then prepare a request for proposal (RFP) for each of your shortlisted providers. This will mean that the training provider’s proposal and quote will be much easier to evaluate and compare.

3. Make a checklist of questions to ask when evaluating your proposals

Having received your proposals for training services you can now evaluate them to see how well each one meets your requirements. Below, I have provided a checklist of questions you can ask of each proposal to help you assess its suitability:

  • How well has each training provider addressed your requirements and learning objectives? Have they covered all the required learning areas in appropriate depth or do they lack emphasis in key areas?
  • Have they addressed your desired learning outcomes? How do they assess the effectiveness of the training, or put differently, how do they actually quantify what learning has actually taken place?
  • Does your providers have sector specific training experience? Are they able to advise on and execute a style of delivery that is optimized to your workforce? The best way to ascertain this is to look at their existing clients to see if your company has affinity with their customer base.
  • Do they offer a training environment that is suited to your workforce?
  • Does the training provider have have an approach and style which is suited to your culture and workforce? Will they be able to gain the trust and respect of key stakeholders and trainees?
  • Have they provided detailed profiles of each of the trainers so you can properly assess the trainers suitability to your workforce?
  • Do they have a post-training, follow-up program with students? This helps to reinforce the learning so it is deeply embedded into their new behaviors and not simply forgotten.
  • Do they have good quality client testimonials, or better still, will they allow you to contact satisfied clients?
  • Do their trainers have the appropriate certifications?
  • Have they won any awards or are they industry recognized?
  • Does the training agency have a transparent complaints process or are they members of a professional or regulatory body? This ensures that you have a means of redress if they don’t come up to standard.
  • Last but not least; does the course offer good value for money? Are more expensive quotes justified, e.g. better qualified trainers, better services, and/or more flexibility.

How to Find the Best Training Provider

Requirements to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

Requirements to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

The document Criteria and Guidelines to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider sets out the requirements for accreditation.

  • The programmes (and/or assessments) offered by the education and training provider must culminate in unit standards and/or qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).
  • The curriculum (design, content and learning materials) is aligned to the unit standards and/or qualifications.
  • There are suitably qualified staff (facilitators and registered assessors).
  • The learners have access to adequate learning support services.
  • The assessment methods and tools used to measure the requirements for the unit standard and/or qualification are fair, valid and reliable, and are used to enhance learning.

Provider Accreditation with an ETQA can often be a daunting process, best left to the professionals.

SETA Accreditation Services offers ETD Providers a fully encompassing accreditation service and/or guidance with the process.

Having in excess of 30 years HR, Labour Relations, Training, Development and Education as well as Administration experience and knowledge, we have the generalist and specialist knowledge required to streamline the Accreditation process and ensure that Providers are accredited by their relevant ETQA as effectively and efficiently as possible, with little or no fuss to the Provider.

Take a moment to look at our site, send us an e-mail or call us, and we will set up a meeting with you to get the process started.

Providers of education and training must apply for accreditation with an Education and Training Quality Assurance (ETQA) body under the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)(link is external). All providers of education and training offering full qualifications must be registered with the Department of Education.

The education and training provider has to offer unit standards and/or qualifications that fall within the primary focus area of the ETQA body of the relevant Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA)(link is external) or professional body.

Requirements for accreditation:

  • The programmes (and/or assessments) offered by the education and training provider must culminate in unit standards and/or qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).
  • The curriculum (design, content and learning materials) is aligned to the unit standards and/or qualifications.
  • There are suitably qualified staff (facilitators and registered assessors).
  • The learners have access to adequate learning support services.
  • The assessment methods and tools used to measure the requirements for the unit standard and/or qualification are fair, valid and reliable, and are used to enhance learning.

The main steps in the accreditation process to become a SETA Accredited Training Provider:

  1. The Training Provider determines the primary focus
  2. The SETA Quality Assurance Management Division requirements are compiled by the provider
  3. The Training Provider completes and submits an online application form for accreditation
  4. A compliance check is conducted by SETA and the provider receives a notification of compliance / non-compliance
  5. The Training Provider responds to the notification if necessary
  6. A site visit is scheduled and conducted by a SETA ETQA evaluator
  7. The evaluator sends his/her report to SETA
  8. The evaluation report is quality assured and the report indicating the status of accreditation is sent to the provider. Where applicable, areas of remediation will be detailed in the report.
  9. The Training Provider is required to respond to areas of remediation if necessary, and make the relevant submission.
  10. Confirm registration with the DHET