SCAMS & FRAUD ALERT

COMMON TRAINING PROVIDER SCAMS & FRAUD ALERT

TRAINYOUCAN Accredited Training Network strives to deliver the highest level of service delivery and 100% compliance with SAQA and the ETQA’s (SETA) guidelines and policies. Not only does this add extra creditability to our brand, but also to the learner satisfaction and competency to perform the actual task.

We at TRAINYOUCAN Accredited Training Network do not want to be associated with any of the common Training Provider Scams and Fraud and will never entertain any related discussions at any point in time.

Don’t get caught with the most common training scams and fraud!

1. POE building (Portfolio of Evidence) in the class is against the SAQA policy [1] and the NQF Objectives [2] plus a “cheap” way to sell courses by compiling fraudulent evidence for certification. Providers should be reported to the relevant ETQA for investigation and possible de-registration including certified learners as the programmes are offered outside the scope of approval. [8][9][10][11][12][14][15]

2. Reduced classroom (contact session) as per the minimum guidelines of the Unit Standards NQF Credit allocation to save on catering, venue and facilitation cost. [1] [3] [8][9][14][15]

3. Falsely advertising, misleading learners with content or the inappropriate/unauthorised use of the SAQA or SETA logos or trademarks [6] with learning content that does not meet the NQF principles [2] where either the learning programme or the training provider is not accredited by the relevant ETQA for delivery. [4] [6]

4. Issuing of certification (mostly in class) without complete/any uploading of learner achievements and the confirmation of receipt (copy of the SOR – Statement of Results) on the ETQA/NRLD database, also known as “Selling Certificates”. [6][12][15]

5. Not providing the relevant supporting structures as defined by the SAQA policy for Accreditation of Training Provider[7][8][9] or limiting the supporting /enrolment period with sub-clauses of impossible/unreasonable timelines. [14]

Reference sources:

[1] SAQA Policy 2003: The National Qualifications Framework and the Standards Setting; reference to page 9, “Credit system”.

‘Notional hours of learning’ refers to the learning time that it would take an average learner to meet the outcomes defined, such as: contact time, time spent in structured learning in the workplace, individual learning and assessment.

The process include:

    1. Delivery. (Typical contact session + formative assessments).
    2. Workplace experience. (Outside the classroom before assessment can take place)
    3. Assessment. (Summative assessment)
    4. Certification.

[2] National Qualifications Framework Act, 2008 (Act 67 of 2008) – NQF Objectives.

The objectives of the NQF as outlined in the NQF Act No 67 of 2008 are as follows:

  • To create a single integrated national framework for learning achievements;
  • Facilitate access to, and mobility and progression within, education, training and career paths;
  • Enhance the quality of education and training;
  • Accelerate the redress of past unfair discrimination in education, training and employment opportunities.

The objectives of the NQF are designed to contribute to the full personal development of each learner and the social and economic development of the nation at large.

[3] SAQA Guidelines: Criteria and Guidelines for the Accreditation of Providers, 01 October 2001, page 25, section 3.D.iii in respect of: Policies and practices for learner entry, guidance and support systems.

 

[4] Understanding the different definitions of “accreditation”  including (a) a persons accreditation, (b) a Training Providers accreditation or (c) the Learning Programmes accreditation.

 

[5]  Notional learning hours are the estimated learning time taken by the ‘average’ student to achieve the specified learning outcomes of the course-unit or programme. They are therefore not a precise measure but provide students with an indication of the amount of study and degree of commitment expected.

 

[6] No reference on the SAQA policies or guidelines found, but general good  practices for operation and authentication should be used. The only reference found as the criteria SAQA provides on the information that should appear on the certificate that is in direct conflict of issuing certificate with reference to the in-appropriate use of NQF, Credits, Unit Standards and ETQA or SAQA logos.

SAQA Policy: Policy on Usage of SAQA Trademarks by Stakeholders

 The Trademarks lodged are the following:

  • South African Qualifications Authority
  • SAQA
  • South African Qualifications Authority together with the old and new Q devices
  • National Qualifications Framework
  • NQF
  • National Learners’ Records Database
  • NLRD
  • NQF support link together with logo
  • Khetha

 

[7] ETQAs are accredited by SAQA for “…the purpose of monitoring and auditing achievements in terms of national standards or qualifications and standards” (SAQA, 2001c:7). In turn, ETQAs are responsible for accrediting providers34 whose primary focus35 coincides with the primary focus of the ETQA, provided that the body seeking accreditation:

 

  • is registered as a provider in terms of the applicable legislation36;
  • has an effective and functional QMS as required by the ETQA regulations;
  • is able to develop, deliver and evaluate learning programmes, which culminate in specified registered standards and qualifications;
  • has the necessary financial, administrative and physical resources;
  • has the necessary policies, practices and reporting procedures as required by the ETQA regulations; and
  • has not already been granted accreditation by another ETQA.

 

SAQA (2001a) prescribes only two forms of  Training Provider Accreditation:

 

  • Provisional accreditation: “Granted for an agreed, limited period of time according to an agreed programme of development to enable full accreditation criteria to be met, provided the interests of the learner are protected” (SAQA, 2001a:11).
  • Full Accreditation: “The certification, usually for a particular period of time, of a person, a body or an institution as having the capacity to fulfil a particular function in the quality assurance system set up by the South African Qualifications Authority in terms of the Act” (SAQA, 2001a:17).

 

[8] SAQA Guidelines: Criteria and Guidelines for the Accreditation of Providers, 01 October 2001, page 26, section 3.D.iv in respect of: Policies and practices for managing off-site practical or work-site components.

 

[9] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Principles of the NQF, namely:

 

  1. Integration; To form part of a system of human resources development which provides for the establishment of a unifying approach to education and training.
  2. Relevance; To be and remain responsive to national development needs.
  3. Credibility; To have international and national value and acceptance.
  4. Coherence; To work within a consistent framework of principles and certification.
  5. Flexibility; To allow for multiple pathways to the same learning ends.
  6. Standards; To be expressed in terms of a nationally agreed framework and internationally acceptable outcomes.
  7. Legitimacy; To provide for the participation of all national stakeholders in the planning and co-ordination of standards and qualifications.
  8. Access; To provide ease of entry to appropriate levels of education and training for all prospective learners in a manner which facilitates progression.
  9. Articulation; To provide for learners, on successful completion of accredited prerequisites, to move between components of the delivery system.
  10. Progression; To ensure that the framework of qualifications permits individuals to move through the levels of national qualifications via different appropriate combinations of the components of the delivery system.
  11. Portability; To enable learners to transfer credits of qualifications from one learning institution and/or employer to another.
  12. Recognition of Prior Learning; To, through assessment, give credit to learning which has already been acquired in different ways.
  13. Guidance of learners; To provide for counseling of learners by specially trained individuals who meet nationally recognized standards for educators and trainers.

 

[10] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Principles of Assessment, namely:

 

  • Fairness
  • Validity
  • Reliability
  • Practicability

 

[11] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Principles of OBET (Outcome Based Education and Training) with regards to Applied competence that consist out of:

 

  • Practical competence; The demonstrated ability to perform a set of tasks in an authentic context. A range of actions or possibilities is considered, and decisions are made about which actions to follow.

 

  • Foundational competence; The demonstrated understanding of what the learner is doing and why. This underpins the practical competence and therefore the actions taken.

 

  • Reflexive competence; The demonstrated ability to integrate performance with understanding, so as to show that the learner is able to adapt to changed circumstances appropriately and responsibly, and to explain the reason behind an action.

 

[12] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Formative and Summative Assessment.

 

  • Formative assessment refers to assessment that takes place during the process of learning and teaching.

 

  • Assists in the planning future learning
  • Diagnoses the learner’s strength and weaknesses
  • Provides feedback to the learner on his/her progress
  • Helps to make decisions on the readiness of learners to do a summative assessment
  • Is developmental in nature
  • Credits/certificates are not awarded

 

  • Summative assessment is assessment for making a judgement about achievement. This is carried out when a learner is ready to be assessed at the end of a programme of learning.

 

  • At the end of a learning programme (qualification, unit standard, or part qualification)
  • To determine whether the learner is competent or not yet competent
  • In knowledge and inputs-based systems, this usually occurs after a specified period of study.
  • In OBET, learner-readiness determines when assessments will take place
  • Is carried out when the assessor and the learner agree that the learner is ready for assessment

 

[13] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Formative Assessments leads to Summative Assessments.

 

Results initially collected as results for formative assessment, can be used for summative assessment with the agreement of the learner. This will prevent having to assess outcomes twice.

 

The organization of the learning programme will inform decisions on when summative assessments can take place, e.g. a learning programme can be organized around one outcome or a set of outcomes, depending on what is appropriate in terms of ensuring learner success. Summative assessments are administered when a learner has gone through such a programme and is ready to be assessed. On declaration of competence, credit is then given, recorded and reported.

 

[14] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Quality of Evidence that consist out of:

 

  1. Validity of evidence

Does the evidence relate to the specific outcomes and criteria to be assessed? Evidence is not automatically valid (or invalid) – evidence should be appropriate to hat is being assessed.

 

  1. Authenticity of evidence

Can the evidence be attributed to the learner? Is the evidence the learner’s own work? In written assessments, safeguards against dishonesty have long been in place. In  BET, there is no difficulty in checking authenticity where the assessor is observing the learner directly. However, where indirect evidence is produced, or where group work was undertaken, the assessor has to verify that the evidence is the learner’s own work, and in the case of group work, that he/she has made a fair contribution to the end-result.

 

  1. Sufficiency of evidence

Is there enough evidence to meet all the criteria needed to certify the learner as  competent? Is the assessor confident that the performance can be repeated? The use of various sources of evidence and a variety of assessment activities assist in ensuring that the evidence is sufficient. This will ensure that enough evidence is provided to meet all the criteria and the applicable range statements.

 

  1. Currency of evidence

Is the evidence related to current competence? Currency refers to the applicability of skills, knowledge and understanding in the present circumstances. In some fields of study, currency of experience and training is of the utmost importance.

 

[15] SAQA Policy: Criteria and Guidelines for Assessment of NQF Registered Unit standards and Qualifications; Steps in the Assessment Process, namely:

 

Preparatory phase, with reference to the section of:

 

Decide on the timing of assessment

The timing of assessments will depend on the following factors:

  • the rationale for assessments at certain points in the learning programme (formative or summative), i.e. will learners be at a logical end-point of learning, or at a point where diagnosis needs to be made?
  • the sharing of facilities with other assessors
  • the extent to which workplace learners will be able to undertake assessments

ABOUT

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY: EMAIL TYPES & STRUCTURES

“ATTENTION! The only method of recovering your files is to purchase a decrypt tool and unique key… Please note that you will never restore your data without payment.”

This is part of a typical message following a ransomware attack.

You may think that you don’t have to worry about these types of cyberattacks. But it only takes one wrong click or one compromised password to become a victim of cybercrime and have a major business problem.

The best way to increase your protection and reduce the risk of having your confidential corporate data breached is to implement a strong cybersecurity structure and provide continuous security training for your employees.

Here, we’ll provide you with cybersecurity tactics that each of your team members can easily apply, and explain the importance of having your data secured, both inside and outside the office.

Dealing with the repercussions of a phishing attack is not only time consuming but costly. One careless click has the potential to compromise your entire network, so it is important that everyone works as a team to protect the company. Make sure there is a system in place to report attacks, and make sure all of your employees understand how important it is to follow through in reporting it.

Deleting the offending email is not the solution—IT needs to know that your company is being targeted. Train your employees to contact your IT department immediately so that IT can take appropriate action, and create a feedback loop to help improve the email filter.

While structured annual or semiannual cybersecurity awareness training is recommended, employees should also receive on-the-fly phishing awareness training when an attack occurs. If an employee clicks on a phishing link, they should receive immediate feedback and additional training. Review the email with them, show them the red flags and indicators they missed, and provide additional training materials to help them avoid being phished in the future.

Vade Secure users receive a warning banner at the time-of-click if a URL has been identified as phishing. If the user clicks on a phishing link, IT receives a notification, along with a link to a phishing training handout. This ensures they are immediately aware of their mistake and connects the incident with the training.

In this course you will learn the role of email security in the workplace as well as why it’s important. How to keep staff and the organisation protected, and includes:

  • GDPR Implications – GDPR has changed how businesses should view email security. We discuss the implications and considerations of the new legislation on organizational email security.
  • Resources For Employees and Managers – Suitable if you want to provide your employees with training, or are a manager looking for extra tips, resources and demos on email security.

There are dozens and dozens of potential threats that can start through email. They come in many forms and almost all of them include some form of human interaction.

All of the most significant and common threats to your company’s files and your email security happen because of something that someone does.

With regular training for employees that includes phishing simulations, courses on IT and security best practices, and data protection and compliance training, businesses can significantly reduce risk, decrease infections and related help desk costs, protect their reputation by experiencing fewer breaches, and secure their overall cyber security investment.

COURSE CONTENT:

1. INTRODUCTION TO EMAILS.

        • INTRODUCTION
        • ACTIVITY
        • EMAIL SECURITY TERMINOLOGY

2. TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE.

        • TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS
        • EMAIL TYPE: “POP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “IMAP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “EXCHANGE”

3. STRUCTURE OF AN EMAIL AND EMAIL ADDRESS.

        • EMAIL STRUCTURE
        • THE EMAIL HEADER
        • EMAIL ADDRESS
        • STRUCTURE
        • THE @ SYMBOL

4. EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.

        • ABOUT EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES
        • HOW TO VIEW AN EMAILS HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.
        • UNDERSTANDING EMAIL HEADERS
        • IP ADDRESS

The Importance of Training & Development in the Workplace

The Importance of Training & Development in the Workplace

Training presents a prime opportunity to expand the knowledge base of all employees, but many employers find the development opportunities expensive. Employees also miss out on work time while attending training sessions, which may delay the completion of projects. Despite the potential drawbacks, training and development provides both the company as a whole and the individual employees with benefits that make the cost and time a worthwhile investment.

What is employee development?

Employee training and development are terms often used interchangeably, across sectors, and encompass various employee learning practices. More specifically, employee training involves programs that enable employees to learn precise skills or gain knowledge to improve job performance. Employee development is a process whereby the manager and employee work together to create a development plan. This plan identifies areas to develop or enhance, and ascertains what actions or activities need to be taken to acquire and embed that learning. This development plan is aligned with the organization’s goals and ultimately serves as a template showing skills that the employee requires and how they can go about acquiring them. Now, more than ever, owing to the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution and the COVID-19 pandemic, learning and development (L&D) in business is taking top priority in the workplace.

One of the biggest challenges faced by business leaders driving the adoption of disruptive technology, is insufficient internal skills when combining technology with technical proficiency. As industries innovate so new technologies emerge, which has a profound impact on education and development. The ability to merge new technology with creative learning methods will ensure that teams learn new skills or reskill dynamically, through a future-oriented approach.

Importance of Training

Training is crucial for organizational development and success. It is fruitful to both employers and employees of an organization. An employee will become more efficient and productive if he is trained well.

Training is given on four basic grounds:

  1. New candidates who join an organization are given training. This training familiarize them with the organizational mission, vision, rules and regulations and the working conditions.
  2. The existing employees are trained to refresh and enhance their knowledge.
  3. If any updations and amendments take place in technology, training is given to cope up with those changes. For instance, purchasing a new equipment, changes in technique of production, computer implantment. The employees are trained about use of new equipments and work methods.
  4. When promotion and career growth becomes important. Training is given so that employees are prepared to share the responsibilities of the higher level job.

The benefits of training can be summed up as:

  1. Improves morale of employees- Training helps the employee to get job security and job satisfaction. The more satisfied the employee is and the greater is his morale, the more he will contribute to organizational success and the lesser will be employee absenteeism and turnover.
  2. Less supervision- A well trained employee will be well acquainted with the job and will need less of supervision. Thus, there will be less wastage of time and efforts.
  3. Fewer accidents- Errors are likely to occur if the employees lack knowledge and skills required for doing a particular job. The more trained an employee is, the less are the chances of committing accidents in job and the more proficient the employee becomes.
  4. Chances of promotion- Employees acquire skills and efficiency during training. They become more eligible for promotion. They become an asset for the organization.
  5. Increased productivity- Training improves efficiency and productivity of employees. Well trained employees show both quantity and quality performance. There is less wastage of time, money and resources if employees are properly trained.

1. Improves employee performance

The prime motivator for employee training is to improve productivity and performance. And when executed well, it does just that. It provides your employees with the expertise they need to fulfil their role and make a positive impact on your business. The skills they learn empower them to deliver a better quality of work with a fast turnaround rate.

It also gives your hires a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities within your organization. They know their targets and they’re equipped with the tools to effectively meet them.

2. Increases engagement

Engaged employees have an increased level of productivity – it’s as simple as that! Through training, you’re continuously engaging your employees and enabling them to engage back. There is two-way communication, opinions and internal workings are shared, meaning your employees are always up to date with what’s going on. This makes them more emotionally invested. They care about their role and are more willing to commit their time and energy to the company.

3. Improves employee retention and growth

It’s common knowledge that the hiring and onboarding process can be a costly and time-consuming task. And a powerful by-product of increased performance and engagement through training is improved employee retention.

Training boosts a feeling of value in employees. It shows that you’re committed to providing them with the resources needed to ensure they’re doing a good job. In turn, they’re more likely to enjoy their work and remain in your organization for longer. It also nurtures them further in their career within your organization. One of the biggest benefits is that you’ll have more opportunities to hire from within, reducing recruiting and onboarding costs for your business.

4. Consistency in training

Creating consistency within an organization is difficult. But training helps reduce a disparity between your teams. Each employee has a baseline knowledge of their individual and their team’s goals, putting everyone on the same page. Additionally, employees all receiving the same training means they share responsibility and are aware of their role on the team.

5. Tracks employee skills

With eLearning, particularly with a learning management system (LMS), you can track the training your employees have taken. This has two big advantages.

Through insightful reports, you know if your employees are up to date with their training. Reports are a powerful tool if you’re delivering onboarding training or have to prove training has taken place, as is usually the case for compliance training. Tracking your training also helps you to provide better training for your employees. It enables you to identify what they are and aren’t engaging with. So, you can improve your course content based on these insights, ensuring that your employees get better training overall.

6. Address internal weaknesses

A lack of awareness of internal weakness is a hazardous thing within an organization. Training overcomes this as you can educate your employees on important subjects that help overcome and avoid any issues. Additionally, it creates a knowledge-sharing environment – your employees learn from managements’ and each others’ past mistakes and wins. This ensures that recurring mistakes are reduced and your employees know the strategies for success.

7. Happier customers

Perhaps the most impactful aspect of employee training is its beneficial effect on your business’s growth. Simply put, better-trained employees make more productive team members, that serve your customers better. The result of this is that your customer retention increases – happier customers stick around for longer and buy more. This can powerfully fuel your business’s growth.

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY: EMAIL TYPES & STRUCTURES

Even with the best firewall in place, it can take one wrong turn for a hacker to break into a company: one uninformed click on a phishing email, or one infected USB inserted into a Wi-Fi-connected computer. Even though there are instances of employees maliciously stealing data from organisations, a large amount of security breaches is accidental and due to a lack of security threat awareness. You can ensure that your staff are equipped with the skills and knowledge they need to become your company’s best line of defence against cyber threats. From do-it-yourself to do-it-all-for-you service options, set your staff – and your business’ livelihood – up for success.

1. Phishing explained

Phishing is a type of fraud in which a hacker attempts to gather personal information or credentials by impersonating a legitimate brand and sending users to a malicious website. A common example of this is the Office 365 phishing attack: A hacker sends an email that appears to come from Microsoft asking the user to log in to their Office 365 account. When the user clicks on the link in the email, it takes them to a fake Office 365 login page, where their credentials are harvested. With Microsoft branding and logos both in the email and on the phishing page, an untrained user will not recognize the email as a phishing attempt.

2. Email addresses can be spoofed

Never trust an email based simply on the purported sender. Cybercriminals have many methods to disguise emails. They understand how to trick their victims into thinking a sender is legitimate, when the email is really coming from a malicious source. The most common types of spoofing are display name spoofing and cousin domains. With display name spoofing, the phisher uses a legitimate company name as the email sender, such as microsoftsupport@microsoft.com, but the email underneath is a random address like xyz@yahoo.com. Display name spoofing is most effective when a user views the email on a mobile device because the sender’s email address is hidden. Phishers are counting on the fact that most mobile users will not expand the sender’s name to view the email address.

3. Subject lines and text are often threatening or enticing

Cybercriminals may promise “free iPhones to the first 100 respondents” or threaten that “your credit card will be suspended without immediate action.” Evoking a sense of panic, urgency, or curiosity is a commonly used tactic. Users are typically quick to respond emails that indicate potential financial loss or that could result in personal or financial gain.

Emails that have an aggressive tone or claim that immediate action must be taken to avoid repercussions should be considered a potential scam. This technique is often used to scare people into giving up confidential information. Two examples of this are phishing emails telling users their critical accounts are locked or that an invoice must be paid to avoid services being suspended.

In some spear phishing attacks, personalized emails from purported colleagues are designed to evoke fear of consequences at work. A classic example of this is an urgent email from a CEO requesting gift cards or a wire transfer. Receiving such a request from a top executive creates pressure for the employee and makes them more likely to respond quickly—without thinking it through. Another example is the direct deposit spear phishing email, which is designed to pressure an HR employee into changing direct deposit information.

4. Attacks are becoming more targeted and personal

Many phishing attacks of the past were sent in bulk to a large group of users at once, resulting in impersonal greetings. The emails would often address a user with a generic term like “customer,” “employee,” or “patient.” Your employees should be cautious of these terms, because professional organizations commonly address users by their first name in email, but a personalized email is not a sure sign of a legitimate email. Today’s phishers are including the victim’s name in the subject line and prefilling the victim’s email address on the phishing webpage.

5. Phishing emails are getting more sophisticated

Employees need to read their emails carefully, not just skim them. Many phishing attacks and spear phishing attacks are launched from other countries, and although this can result in glaring grammar and stylistic issues, phishers have become more sophisticated. They have the resources to compose clean emails in their target language, and they make fewer mistakes.

Employees should read emails carefully for both glaring and subtle grammatical issues that might indicate that the sender is not reputable. In a recent Office 365 phishing page discovered by Vade Secure, there was only one discrepancy between the real Office 365 page and the phishing page: an extra space between “&” and “Cookies” in the “Privacy & Cookies” link in the footer of the phishing email.

6. Links aren’t always what they seem

Every phishing email inclues a link, but phishing links are deceptive. While the link text might say “Go to Office 365 account,” the URL takes the user to a phishing page designed to look like Microsoft. Make sure your employees hover over all links before clicking them to see the pop-up that displays the link’s real destination. If it is not the website expected, it is probably a phishing attack.

It is most important to make sure that the core of the URL is correct. Be especially cautious of URLs that end in alternative domain names instead of .com or .org. Additionally, phishers use URL shorteners, such as Bitly, to bypass email filters and trick users, so be cautious of clicking on shortened URLs. IsItPhishing.AI can determine if a URL is legitimate or a phishing link. If you or your employees are in doubt

7. Phishing links can be sent via attachment

All phishing emails contain a link, but it’s not always in the email. To avoid detection by email security filters, hackers will include a phishing link in an attachment, such as a PDF or Word doc, rather than the body of the email. And because sandboxing technology scans attachments for malware, not links, the email will look clean. The email itself will appear to be from a legitimate business, vendor, or colleague, asking you to open the attachment and click on the link to review or update information.

In this course you will learn the role of email security in the workplace as well as why it’s important. How to keep staff and the organisation protected, and includes:

  • GDPR Implications – GDPR has changed how businesses should view email security. We discuss the implications and considerations of the new legislation on organizational email security.
  • Resources For Employees and Managers – Suitable if you want to provide your employees with training, or are a manager looking for extra tips, resources and demos on email security.

There are dozens and dozens of potential threats that can start through email. They come in many forms and almost all of them include some form of human interaction.

All of the most significant and common threats to your company’s files and your email security happen because of something that someone does.

With regular training for employees that includes phishing simulations, courses on IT and security best practices, and data protection and compliance training, businesses can significantly reduce risk, decrease infections and related help desk costs, protect their reputation by experiencing fewer breaches, and secure their overall cyber security investment.

COURSE CONTENT:

1. INTRODUCTION TO EMAILS.

        • INTRODUCTION
        • ACTIVITY
        • EMAIL SECURITY TERMINOLOGY

2. TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE.

        • TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS
        • EMAIL TYPE: “POP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “IMAP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “EXCHANGE”

3. STRUCTURE OF AN EMAIL AND EMAIL ADDRESS.

        • EMAIL STRUCTURE
        • THE EMAIL HEADER
        • EMAIL ADDRESS
        • STRUCTURE
        • THE @ SYMBOL

4. EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.

        • ABOUT EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES
        • HOW TO VIEW AN EMAILS HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.
        • UNDERSTANDING EMAIL HEADERS
        • IP ADDRESS

Anti Money Laundering & Countering of Terrorist Financing course

Requirements

  • You need basic device with video viewing capability This course is for working professionals with basic understanding of business, banking and financial subjects , even freshers & student already in Pre and Graduation level aspiring for a Career in Compliance related field in the Financial Industry Globally

The FICA Awareness Training is aimed at employees of accountable institutions and covers basic money-laundering and terrorist financing concepts, anti-money-laundering legislation in South Africa, the risk-based approach, and looks at the requirements for customer due diligence, reporting of certain transactions and record-keeping requirements.

WHAT WILL THE FICA COURSE ENABLE YOU TO DO?

  • The course deals with Anti-Money Laundering (AML) and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (CFT), the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, POCA and POCDATARA, risk-management and compliance programmes (RMCP), customer due diligence, cash threshold and suspicious transaction reporting, terrorist property reporting and record-keeping.

Terrorist Financing
This topic provides and explanation of Terrorism, Sources of Terrorist financing, the objectives of Terrorist organisations, and the impact of Money-laundering and financing terrorism.

 

Anti-money laundering legislation
This topic looks at the various Anti-Money Laundering (AML) and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (CFT) legislation in South Africa. Legislation covered include FICA, POCA and POCDATARA.

Role players and their responsibilities
This topic focuses on the various players in the AML/CFT arena and explains their responsibilities in terms of Reporting, Risk Management, Internal Controls,

Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should be able to:

1. Appraise, analyse and synthesize the concepts of anti-money laundering/counter financing of terrorism (AML/CFT).

2. Identify typologies and incidences of  money laundering and financing of terrorism.

3. Examine measures against money laundering and initiatives taken by various organizations to combat terrorism.

4. Examine the implications of offshore financial centers and non-cooperative countries on AML/CFT.

5. Comprehend regulations applicable to the financial sector.

6. Recognize the implications and penalties for non-compliance with Anti-Money Laundering legislations.

7. Identify and be able to comply with requirements ushered in by the latest legislation in AML/CFT.

8. Undertake due diligence measures to deter money laundering and terrorist financing.

9. Implement relevant AML/CFT measures in their particular sectors.

This Anti- Money Laundering  and Counter Financing of Terrorism course seeks to equip participants with knowledge pertaining to regulatory and structural requirements needed to comply with Anti-Money Laundering/Counter Financing of Terrorism requirements.

COURSE CONTENT:

1. INTRODUCTION TO MONEY LAUNDERING

    • MONEY LAUNDERING HISTORY
    • KEY TAKEAWAYS
    • MONEY LAUNDERING A MASSIVE PROBLEM
    • REGULATION REQUIREMENTS

2. ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING LEGISLATION AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

    • INTRODUCTION
    • UNITED NATION CONVENTIONS
    • ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING LEGISLATION IN THE UK

3. ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING ORGANISATIONS RESPONSIBILITIES

    • INTRODUCTION
    • COMMON TERMINOLOGY USED
    • COMPANY COMPLIANCE
    • REPORTING OFFICER
    • EMPLOYEE SCREENING
    • EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES
    • ANTI-LAUNDERING POLICIES

4. ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING RISK BASED APPROACH

    • COMMON TERMINOLOGY USED
    • TYPES OF BUSINESS TO BE IDENTIFIED
    • YOUR CUSTOMERS
    • LOCATION
    • SECTOR
    • DEVELOPING A RISK BASED APPROACH

5. CUSTOMER DUE DILIGENCE

    • INTRODUCTION
    • COMMON TERMINOLOGY USED
    • CUSTOMER DUE DILIGENCE
    • SITUATIONS TO APPLY TO
    • CUSTOMER IDENTIFICATION OF BENEFICIAL OWNERS
    • CUSTOMER DUE DILIGENCE MEASURES
    • ENHANCED DUE DILIGENCE (E.D.D.)
    • SIMPLIFIED DUE DILIGENCE (S.D.D.)
    • POLITICALLY EXPOSED PERSONS (P.E.P.)
    • RECORD KEEPING
    • HIGH RISK COUNTRIES

6. RECORD KEEPING

    • INTRODUCTION
    • COMMON TERMINOLOGY USED
    • DUE DILIGENCE RECORDS
    • SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTS (S.A.R.)
    • TRAINING RECORDS AND AWARENESS
    • GENERAL RECORDS OF INTERNAL A.M.L. CONTROLS
    • USE OF ELECTRONIC DATA
    • DELETION OF PERSONAL DATA

7. IDENTIFYING AND REPORTING SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY

    • IDENTIFYING SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY
    • SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTING
    • INCLUDED IN EXTERNAL SAR
    • CONFIDENTIALITY
    • CONSENT NEEDED
    • BUSINESS OPERATION AFTER SUBMISSION OF SAR
    • REPORTING SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY
    • WHISTLE-BLOWING

8. STAFF TRAINING

    • RELEVANT BUSINESS
    • TRAINING PROGRAMS
    • TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
    • NOMINATED OFFICER
    • WHEN TO TRAIN
    • WHEN SHOULD TRAINING BE COMPLETED?
    • CPD TRAINING

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY: EMAIL TYPES & STRUCTURES

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY COURSE: EMAIL TYPES & STRUCTURES

  • COURSE NAME: EMAIL CYBER SECURITY: EMAIL TYPES & STRUCTURES
  • REQUIREMENTS: Computer and Internet.
  • ENTRY LEVEL: All levels, basic numeracy and literacy.
  • MINIMUM TIME: 2 Hours +
  • PASS RATE: Required 80%, unlimited re-take.
  • EXAM TYPE: Online QUIZ, True/False and Match.
  • CERTIFICATE: Instant download on completion.

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY COURSE

In this course you will learn the role of email security in the workplace as well as why it’s important. How to keep staff and the organisation protected, and includes:

  • GDPR Implications – GDPR has changed how businesses should view email security. We discuss the implications and considerations of the new legislation on organizational email security.
  • Resources For Employees and Managers – Suitable if you want to provide your employees with training, or are a manager looking for extra tips, resources and demos on email security.

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY COURSE

There are dozens and dozens of potential threats that can start through email. They come in many forms and almost all of them include some form of human interaction.

All of the most significant and common threats to your company’s files and your email security happen because of something that someone does.

With regular training for employees that includes phishing simulations, courses on IT and security best practices, and data protection and compliance training, businesses can significantly reduce risk, decrease infections and related help desk costs, protect their reputation by experiencing fewer breaches, and secure their overall cyber security investment.

EMAIL CYBER SECURITY COURSE

COURSE CONTENT:

1. INTRODUCTION TO EMAILS.

        • INTRODUCTION
        • ACTIVITY
        • EMAIL SECURITY TERMINOLOGY

2. TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE.

        • TYPES OF EMAIL ACCOUNTS
        • EMAIL TYPE: “POP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “IMAP”
        • EMAIL TYPE: “EXCHANGE”

3. STRUCTURE OF AN EMAIL AND EMAIL ADDRESS.

        • EMAIL STRUCTURE
        • THE EMAIL HEADER
        • EMAIL ADDRESS
        • STRUCTURE
        • THE @ SYMBOL

4. EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.

        • ABOUT EMAIL HEADERS AND PROPERTIES
        • HOW TO VIEW AN EMAILS HEADERS AND PROPERTIES.
        • UNDERSTANDING EMAIL HEADERS
        • IP ADDRESS

50334 NATIONAL CERTIFICATE: OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

50334 NATIONAL CERTIFICATE: OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

It is assumed that practitioners have expertise in the subject/occupation field in which they intend to provide education, training and development, at a level required to engage meaningfully in ETD within that field. It is also assumed that learners working towards this qualification hold a FETC or equivalent. Further learning assumptions are specified within the associated unit standards where required.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

Entry Requirements: Practitioners must have expertise in the subject/occupation field in which they intend to provide education, training and development, at a level required to engage meaningfully in ETD within that field.
It is also assumed that learners working towards this qualification hold a Further Education and Training Certificate or equivalent. Further learning assumptions are specified within the associated unit standards where required.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

Who Should Attend?

  • Material Developers
  • Training Facilitators
  • Assessors and Moderators
  • Mentors and Coaches
  • Skills Development Facilitators
  • Human Resource Practitioners

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION
Purpose:

This qualification is for those who want to build on a FETC in any field to enter the field of ODETD as a potential career, and have little or no previous exposure to ETD. The qualification will also be valuable for those who may have been practising within the field, but without formal recognition. This qualification will be useful for:

  • Learning facilitators.
  • Assessors.
  • Learner and learning supporters.
  • Skills Development Facilitators.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

This qualification will provide practitioners with the general ETD skills required at NQF level 5 across five key ETD roles, with the opportunity to specialise further in one of the following four roles:

  • Design and develop learning interventions.
  • Facilitate learning.
  • Design and conduct assessments.
  • Facilitate skills development.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

Practitioners will generally carry out their role within the context of:

  • Given Quality Assurance policies, procedures and processes.
  • A guided and supported learning environment.

Further Educational Training Certificate: Occupational Directed Educational Training and Development Practices is an entry-level qualification, and the first in a series, which leads to levels 5 Diploma and 6 Qualifications for those who want to enter the field of Education, Training and Development (ETD). Learners of this qualification will have the opportunity to build on this qualification via the certificate or diploma in ODETD at level 5. This qualification makes it possible for practitioners to increase their employment prospects, and at the same time provide a means whereby organisations can appoint practitioners in line with proven competencies. Education, Training and Development is also a priority area within the South African context and is supported by legislation, national policies and strategies.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES

Rationale:

The development of skills within and for the workplace is a priority within South Africa, as supported by legislation, national policies and strategies. Much of the needed skills development is carried out by people who have knowledge and skills within their area of expertise, but lack the required skills in relation to ETD. Many of the skills development objectives, nationally and within companies and organisations, are met through the efforts of ETD practitioners operating at NQF Level 5, and this certificate addresses the key competencies of such practitioners.

This qualification will meet the need of those who wish to progress beyond the FETC ODETD, or who wish to enter the field of ETD for the first time. The certificate will also help to increase the employment prospects of ETD practitioners, while helping to ensure quality and competence within the ETD field.

This qualification will provide a means to recognise ODETD practise at level 5 across five key ETD roles in a generalist capacity, with particular application possible in at least one role. Practitioners who wish to extend the skills in ETD to cover further ETD roles should select the Diploma ODETD, Level 5.

OCCUPATIONALLY DIRECTED EDUCATION TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES