UNEMPLOYMENT rate guaranteed to hit the 50% mark before the end of 2024.

South Africa’s unemployment rate is about to reach a historic high of over 50% by the end of 2024, despite recent assurances made during the National Skills Summit on April 23, 2024.  These assurances, delivered by the Minister of Higher Education, come amidst ongoing scrutiny over various issues.

Call me a fortune teller, call me anything you want, but when you see the headlines, remember this article about thousands of private training providers who pleaded for months with the Minister to come to his senses.  #StudentsMustFall, we read your post, and we feel your frustration.  Soon we will all feel the same fate for those who lost out on employment and self-employment.

We’re not driven by political motives; our goal is straightforward: to hit back at hindrances to Black Empowerment, declining self-employment, increasing unemployment rates, failure to tackle critical skills shortages, inadequate communication with stakeholders and the stalling of rural development initiatives.  (Most of these are directly linked to the president’s targets presented in the April 2024 Skill Summit presentation).  It’s time for action; it appears that mere discussion no longer garners attention.

The historical qualifications (through the SETAs) have expired in 2023 and last date for enrolments are set for the end of June 2024.  The new occupational qualifications (through the QCTO) are set to take over from July 2024.

So let’s go and check some facts:

  1. QCTO was established in 2010, fourteen years ago, yet they still lack control over their mandate.
  2. There are hundreds of qualifications which expired in June 2023, with last enrolments set for the end of June 2024, that are still not developed to take over. Currently, we have two months to go.
  3. We have qualifications under the QCTO that are soon set to expire (for review) with still no exam centres registered in South Africa, three years after they were introduced.
  4. The few new qualifications that have been developed to date is not going to contribute to the South African economy or the unemployment For example: We have critical safety and hazard qualifications that are still not developed, but don’t stress, we have the gardener and taxi operator covered.
  5. Exam centres, EISA centres which were recently introduced, is just another money-making scheme added to the unregulated process. It’s not going to add value to one’s education or add credibility to one’s certificate.  It’s just another process and people money making from it.
  6. Communicating or facilitating the QCTO process to the general public by consultants is forbidden.
  7. Over the last fourteen years, the QCTO has conducted only three public workshops, one in each of the three major cities. However, attendees found them poorly presented, resembling dictatorial proceedings.  Our questions remain unanswered, leaving us still seeking clarity.
  8. Virtual sessions were conducted with extremely poor advertising and strict limitations on attendance. Posting content on YouTube doesn’t facilitate public participation.
  9. Other virtual sessions were offered through third parties, with the QCTO present, and these either:
  10. a) requested payment to attend, or
  11. b) were organizational membership-based, or
  12. c) was not recognised by any of the Higher Educations institutions in South Africa, or
  13. d) were conducted to promote a specific online college/company.

Our persistent requests for free and publicly accessible workshops remain unanswered.

  1. Based on data from SAQA in December 2019 and current figures from QCTO as of December 2023, we are set to take over with Occupational Qualifications with over 6000 private training providers in two months’ time. The sad reality is that the majority of these providers are set to close their doors due to a lack of resources or capital to sustain operations.  We, the South Africa Training Providers Forum, currently representing 3084 people, which consists of training providers, consultants and professionals (trainers, assessors and moderators), are intimately aware of their situation and frustrations.
  2. Becoming a registered Training Provider with the QCTO is financially unviable, even if you have the necessary capital and resources at your disposal. Red tape has been added surpassing those typically encountered by colleges, let alone businesses like supermarkets, pubs, restaurants or nightclubs.  Only one example includes the following:
    1. Numerous small training providers have traditionally offered single unit standards and lacked their own facilities or equipment, like classrooms, tractors or forklifts, instead conducting training at their clients’ sites for years. These small businesses now face challenges in obtaining accreditation with the QCTO, as the QCTO requires each training provider to have their own classrooms and equipment.
    2. Additionally, the QCTO requires approval for each training session conducted off-site, posing significant logistical and financial hurdles, especially for short skills programs within limited timeframes and budgets.
  3. Trainers, assessors, and moderators, who have dedicated themselves to this industry, are feeling adrift. To date they have received no communication about the implications of transitioning to QCTO.  Some are not even aware that such a transition is happening.  For those in the know, uncertainty clouds their path: Will their previous assessor and moderator courses hold weight?  Should they first undergo training in registered QCTO courses to obtain statements of results before applying for registration as assessors and moderators?  Who will fund this for them?  Additionally, confusion persists about whether to apply through the Setas or directly with QCTO.  They find themselves utterly bewildered.
  4. The Department of Employment and Labour mandates that employers train their employees in specific safety fields, which falls outside the current scope of QCTO’s mandate. This raises a critical question: should employers opt for non-accredited training options to meet requirements, or risk non-compliance with the Department of Employment and Labour?
  5. Sponsoring learnership for BEE points and TAX rebates will soon become a thing of the past. The system is simply not geared up for it and no interest is shown in addressing
  6. For the past 14 years, the DICTATORSHIP QCTO has consistently failed to effectively communicate events, resources or news to its stakeholders. Even subscribing to their emails or registering with the QCTO as a training provider does not guarantee receipt of information.  Communication typically occurs with select stakeholders only days or hours before the event via social media channels.

 

A petition is currently underway with the aim of requesting an extension for the historical SAQA qualifications and unit standards until replacements are registered for all of them under QCTO.  Additionally, we are advocating for sufficient time to be provided after the registration of all qualifications and skills programs under the QCTO for training providers, assessors, and moderators to apply for and receive accreditation and registration.  As of now, we are just over halfway to our goal of ten thousand participants.  The link to the petition can be found on the South Africa Training Providers Forum’s website.  We encourage anyone impacted by these changes to visit the South African Training Providers Forum’s website or Facebook page and sign the petition.  Your support is essential for advancing our shared objectives.

As the majority echoes “Amen,” we’ve expressed everything.  We warned you, we pleaded with you, and we begged you.  Now, we’re all destined to become yet another statistic in South Africa.

Could a plea to international investors potentially yield a difference?

South African Training Providers Forum

www.trainingforum.org.za

URGENT ACTION REQUIRED by the Department of Higher Education, Science and Technology to Extend ALL SETA Legacy Qualifications and Skills Programmes

All SETA legacy qualifications and each unit standard-based skills programme currently held within most of the SETAs will expire end of June 2024 and are due to be replaced by the OQSF (Occupational Qualifications Sub Framework) format qualification, which is composed of theoretical, practical, and work experience modules.

New qualifications were meant to be re-scoped and mapped out across all the. The qualifications were then meant to be implemented and managed by the QCTO within the NQF (National Qualifications Framework).

However, in less than 10 weeks all SETAs most Historical Qualifications expire with no replacement qualifications developed to be implemented as the replacements. This is going to create a huge crisis in all sectors of South Africa where there will be no educational facility to train and develop new skills and qualified individuals.

The Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) est 2010 in terms of the Skills Development Act Nr. 97 of 1998 is mandated to do the following:

  1. Oversee the design, implementation, assessment, and certification of occupational qualifications, including trades, on the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework (OQSF).
  2. Offer guidance to skills development providers who must be accredited by the QCTO to offer occupational qualifications.

The QCTO has failed in its duty to fulfil its mandated obligations of overseeing the design, implementation, assessment, and certification of all tourism guiding qualifications and skills programmes. There has also been a failure in offering support and guidance to skill development providers and occupational training delivery partners. Many of the due to expire skills programmes have not been aligned to the OQSF by the QCTO.  Occupations Qualifications are still not developed, nor are any EISA Centers registered.

In Minister Dr. Blade Nzimande’s presentation the following points were brought forth on the 23th of April 2024 as targets for the Department of Higher Education, Science and Technology:

  1. Infrastructure development for the provision of service delivery.
  2. Significant reduction in unemployment including amongst graduates.
  3. Sustainable entrepreneurship, SMMEs, and cooperatives which promotes self-employment.
  4. Holistic digitization and advancement of technological infrastructure and development to benefit the country.
  5. Effective and efficient shared services on information and communications technology.
  6. Fundamental rural development.

The status of the SETA legacy qualifications and skills programmes and their imminent expiry place all these targets at risk. With no alignment or replacement to the current skills programmes within the OQSF this will result in increased unemployment for graduates as there are fewer qualifications and career path options.

A lack of infrastructure development for the provision of service delivery especially to remote areas of the country.

Little to no growth within sustainable entrepreneurship, SMMEs and cooperatives that promote self-employment as the ability to do these relies on professional and high-standard training and educational development.

Published on SA Training Forum.

Tummy Weight Loss

The aim is focusing on healthy products where individuals can improve their overall quality of life, reduce the risk of health problems, and contribute to a more sustainable and thriving planet.

It’s important to prioritize health and self care- in a hostilic way.

Maintaining a flat tummy and overall healthiness is a great goal! …Our main aim is to focus on overall health and well-being rather than just achieving a flat tummy. A healthy lifestyle/ Products that will not only help you look good but also feel good from the inside out!
Flat Tummy and healthiness company or product aims to inspire and empower individuals to prioritize their health, make positive lifestyle changes, and cultivate a sense of well-being that encompasses physical, mental, and emotional wellness. By offering a range of solutions, support, and resources, such product can contribute to improving overall health outcomes and enhancing the quality of life for customers.

www.flattummyandhealthiness.co.za

The products are part of a Comprehensive approach to promoting healthiness

Products contains natural ingredients that do offer numerous benefits for maintaining a healthy body and mind. Natural ingredients derived from plants, herbs, and other sources can provide essential nutrients, antioxidants, and therapeutic properties that support overall health and well-being.

Ultimately, the goal of a flat tummy and healthiness company would be to improve the lives of its customers by helping them achieve their health and fitness goals in a sustainable and positive way. Other reason may be :

1. Empower others : By helping individuals to improve their health

2. Positive impact: making a positive impact on people’s lives by promoting healthy, habits, nutrition and exercise, promoting self-love, encouraging customers to embrace their bodies and prioritize their overall health and well-being.

3. Personal passion: Very much passion on healthy lifestyle and also the zeal to help and support others. Allowing myself to pursue a interests and also make a difference

4. Holistic Approach: a hostilic approach to well- being, addressing not just physical fitness but also mental wellness, stress management and overall lifestyle improvement.

5. Educating and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their health and well-being.
6. Providing effective products and services that support customers in their journey towards a healthier lifestyle.

7. Building a community of like-minded individuals who can support and motivate each other in their health and fitness goals

We have different products in particular, example of some of the products are :

1.Booty Boost and Curve enhancer combo/ Products.

The benefits of this product is that the products can play a role in boosting a woman’s confidence, it is essential to approach them as one component of a holistic approach to self-confidence and well-being. Confidence is a complex and multifaceted aspect of personal identity that can be influenced by various factors, including self-acceptance, self-care, mental health, relationships, and personal growth. It’s important for individuals to prioritize self-love, acceptance, and inner strength as the foundation for building confidence, while using external products or programs as supportive tools in their journey.

2.Body Makeover Combo:

• it’s a Weight loss pack, a 30 Days supply, designed to kick start a journey towards losing excess weight and acquiring a sexy flat stomach and other benefits:
•Appetite suppressant
•Increases energy
•Reduces bloat
• Boosts metabolism
• Anti-irritant, anti-allergenic and antibacterial
• Reduces cholesterol levels
• Improves circulation

In conclusion, products containing natural ingredients can be valuable tools for individuals looking to maintain a healthy body and mind. By harnessing the power of nature’s ingredients, these products can offer a safe, effective, and sustainable way to support overall health, vitality, and balance.

www.flattummyandhealthiness.co.za

ABOUT

The aim is focusing on healthy products where individuals can improve their overall quality of life, reduce the risk of health problems, and contribute to a more sustainable and thriving planet.

It’s important to prioritize health and self care- in a hostilic way.

Maintaining a flat tummy and overall healthiness is a great goal! …Our main aim is to focus on overall health and well-being rather than just achieving a flat tummy. A healthy lifestyle/ Products that will not only help you look good but also feel good from the inside out!
Flat Tummy and healthiness company or product aims to inspire and empower individuals to prioritize their health, make positive lifestyle changes, and cultivate a sense of well-being that encompasses physical, mental, and emotional wellness. By offering a range of solutions, support, and resources, such product can contribute to improving overall health outcomes and enhancing the quality of life for customers.

The products are part of a Comprehensive approach to promoting healthiness

Products contains natural ingredients that do offer numerous benefits for maintaining a healthy body and mind. Natural ingredients derived from plants, herbs, and other sources can provide essential nutrients, antioxidants, and therapeutic properties that support overall health and well-being.

Ultimately, the goal of a flat tummy and healthiness company would be to improve the lives of its customers by helping them achieve their health and fitness goals in a sustainable and positive way. Other reason may be :

1. Empower others : By helping individuals to improve their health

2. Positive impact: making a positive impact on people’s lives by promoting healthy, habits, nutrition and exercise, promoting self-love, encouraging customers to embrace their bodies and prioritize their overall health and well-being.

3. Personal passion: Very much passion on healthy lifestyle and also the zeal to help and support others. Allowing myself to pursue a interests and also make a difference

4. Holistic Approach: a hostilic approach to well- being, addressing not just physical fitness but also mental wellness, stress management and overall lifestyle improvement.

5. Educating and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their health and well-being.
6. Providing effective products and services that support customers in their journey towards a healthier lifestyle.

7. Building a community of like-minded individuals who can support and motivate each other in their health and fitness goals

ABOUT

We have different products in particular, example of some of the products are :

1.Booty Boost and Curve enhancer combo/ Products.

The benefits of this product is that the products can play a role in boosting a woman’s confidence, it is essential to approach them as one component of a holistic approach to self-confidence and well-being. Confidence is a complex and multifaceted aspect of personal identity that can be influenced by various factors, including self-acceptance, self-care, mental health, relationships, and personal growth. It’s important for individuals to prioritize self-love, acceptance, and inner strength as the foundation for building confidence, while using external products or programs as supportive tools in their journey.

2.Body Makeover Combo:

• it’s a Weight loss pack, a 30 Days supply, designed to kick start a journey towards losing excess weight and acquiring a sexy flat stomach and other benefits:
•Appetite suppressant
•Increases energy
•Reduces bloat
• Boosts metabolism
• Anti-irritant, anti-allergenic and antibacterial
• Reduces cholesterol levels
• Improves circulation

In conclusion, products containing natural ingredients can be valuable tools for individuals looking to maintain a healthy body and mind. By harnessing the power of nature’s ingredients, these products can offer a safe, effective, and sustainable way to support overall health, vitality, and balance.

ABOUT

The Pothole Nursery in Crestholme, Durban

The Pothole Nursery

The Pothole Nursery is located in Crestholme /  Waterfall area in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal.

The small private nursery that is located between trees and lots of wild life specialises in selected plant including accessories for the local community. Inside the nursery they also sell arts and crafts products from the local community.

The Pothole Nursery is located at 15 Umdoni Road, Crestholme

Training and Development Practitioner

A Training and Development Practitioner, also known as a Training and Development Specialist or Professional, is an individual who specializes in designing, implementing, and evaluating training and development programs within an organization. Their primary goal is to enhance the skills, knowledge, and capabilities of employees to improve their job performance and contribute to the organization’s overall success. Here are some key aspects of this role:

  1. Needs Analysis: Training and Development Practitioners begin by conducting needs assessments to identify the specific skills and knowledge gaps within the organization. They may use surveys, interviews, performance evaluations, and other methods to determine the training needs.
  2. Program Design: Once the training needs are identified, practitioners design training programs and materials that address those needs. They create training modules, curriculum, and content that align with organizational goals and objectives.
  3. Content Development: They develop training materials, such as presentations, handouts, e-learning modules, and manuals, to deliver the training effectively. They may also leverage technology to create engaging and interactive training materials.
  4. Training Delivery: Training and Development Practitioners are responsible for delivering training sessions to employees, either in-person or through virtual platforms. They use various instructional methods and techniques to ensure effective learning and engagement.
  5. Evaluation and Feedback: After training sessions, practitioners assess the effectiveness of the training programs. They gather feedback from participants, conduct post-training evaluations, and measure the impact of training on job performance and business outcomes.
  6. Continuous Improvement: They continuously update and improve training programs based on feedback and changes in organizational needs. This involves staying current with industry trends and emerging best practices in training and development.
  7. Compliance and Legal Requirements: Training practitioners ensure that training programs comply with relevant laws and regulations, such as workplace safety standards and diversity and inclusion guidelines.
  8. Employee Development: Beyond immediate training needs, they may also focus on long-term employee development plans, career pathing, and succession planning to help employees grow within the organization.
  9. Technology and Learning Management Systems: Training and Development Practitioners often use learning management systems (LMS) and other technology tools to manage and track training progress, record employee performance, and automate administrative tasks.
  10. Communication and Collaboration: They work closely with HR professionals, managers, subject matter experts, and other stakeholders to ensure that training programs align with the organization’s strategic objectives and meet the needs of various departments.

Successful Training and Development Practitioners possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, a strong understanding of adult learning principles, instructional design expertise, and the ability to adapt to changing business needs. They play a crucial role in fostering a culture of continuous learning and development within an organization, ultimately contributing to employee growth and organizational success.

101321 Training and Development Practitioner

101321 Training and Development Practitioner

SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE

101321 Occupational Certificate: Training and Development Practitioner

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION

Purpose: The purpose of the 101321 Training and Development Practitioner qualification is to prepare a learner to operate as a Learning and Development Practitioner.

A Learning and Development Practitioner plans, writes learning objectives, selects and adapts learning resources required for the delivery of learning interventions, and facilitates learning in an occupational context.

The 101321 Training and Development Practitioner enable the learner to:

  1. Co-ordinate learning within an occupational context.
  2. Establish and refine learning and development needs within occupational contexts.
  3. Conceptualise, plan and implement occupationally relevant learning and development interventions.
  4. Facilitate learning in a variety of occupational contexts.
  5. Evaluate the impact of learning and development interventions within an occupational context.

101321 Occupational Certificate: Training and Development Practitioner

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Rationale:

The development of the national skills base within South Africa, as supported by legislation, national policies and strategies is an undisputed priority. Equitable human development that supports an inclusive economic growth path, addresses recognised skills shortages and a reduction in high levels of unemployment, will only be achieved through an educated, skilled and capable South African workforce. This qualification is an essential building block in realising these national priorities.

Many of the skills development priorities, nationally and within companies and organisations, are met through the efforts of learning and development practitioners, and this qualification addresses the key competencies of such practitioners.

The qualification will increase the employment prospects of Occupational Learning practitioners, while helping to ensure quality and competence within the Occupational Learning field.

The qualification further supports the continued development of key established employment opportunities associated with occupationally directed education and training, including, skills development facilitation, assessment practitioners and Skills Development Facilitator (SDF) practitioners as part qualifications.

The qualification also places emphasis on the educational strategy that provides learners with real-life work experiences where they can apply knowledge and technical skills, and develop their employability through work based learning. This qualification recognises the need for qualified practitioners that are competent in planning and facilitating work based learning interventions, as a part qualification. This will achieve the need for qualified persons who are able to support workplaces and learners with the implementation of work experience components of learnerships, internships and apprenticeships.

The qualification is designed to meet the competency profile of persons delivering learning and development services, at the interface of the delivery of learning and development services within the occupational qualification framework. This recognises a further need for professional development at higher levels of learning and development research, planning, design and impact assessment.

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL):
RPL for access to the external integrated summative assessment: Accredited providers and approved workplaces must apply the internal assessment criteria specified in the related curriculum document to establish and confirm prior learning. Accredited providers and workplaces must confirm prior learning by issuing a statement of result or certifying a work experience record.

RPL for access to the qualification: Accredited providers and approved workplaces may recognise prior learning against the relevant access requirements.

Entry Requirements:
Level 4 with Communication.

101321 Training and Development Practitioner QUALIFICATION RULES

This qualification is made up of the following compulsory Knowledge and Practical Skill Modules:

Knowledge Modules:
242401001-KM-01, The statutory learning and development environment, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-KM-02, Learning and development management functions, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-KM-03, Organisational learning and development needs analysis, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-KM-04, Facilitation of learning in an occupational context, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-KM-05, Assessment principles and practices, Level 5, 4 Credits.
242401001-KM-06, Workplace learning and development planning, evaluation and reporting, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-KM-07, Work based learning, Level 5, 6 Credits.
Total number of credits for Knowledge Modules: 50.

Practical Skill Modules:
242401001-PM-01, Manage and coordinate logistics, facilities and financial resources, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-PM-02, Plan, conduct and report on a learning and development needs analysis, Level 5, 16 Credits.
242401001-PM-03, Plan the delivery of an occupational learning intervention, Level 5, 16 Credits.
242401001-PM-04, Facilitate different methodologies, training styles and techniques within an occupational learning context, Level 5, 12 Credits.
242401001-PM-05, Facilitate experiential work based learning, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-PM-06, Plan and conduct the assessment of learner competencies, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-PM-07, Evaluate the impact of learning within an occupational context, Level 5, 8 Credits.
Total number of credits for Practical Skill Modules: 76.

This qualification also requires the following Work Experience Modules:
242401001-WM-01, Conduct learning and development management practices, Level 5, 12 Credits.
242401001-WM-02, Conduct skills development facilitation (SDF) processes as required for mandatory grant payments, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-WM-03, Conduct learning and development planning and implementation processes, Level 5, 12 Credits.
242401001-WM-04, Facilitate an occupational learning session, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-WM-05, Facilitate a work based learning and development process, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-WM-06, Conduct assessments of learner competence, Level 5, 8 Credits.
242401001-WM-07, Conduct an evaluation of the impact of learning within an occupational context, Level 5, 8 Credits.
Total number of credits for Work Experience Modules: 64.

EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES

1. Analyse learning and development needs, within an occupational context, compile learning and development plans and reports and guide stakeholders on learning and development trends, practices and quality assurance.
2. Schedule, coordinate implements and evaluate an occupationally relevant learning and development intervention.
3. Coordinate and manage learning and development within an occupational context.
4. Facilitate learning in an occupational context utilising adult learning principles and techniques.
5. Plan, implement and evaluate work based learning interventions in an occupational context.
6. Plan and conduct assessments in a variety of occupational contexts.

101321 Training and Development Practitioner ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
Learning priorities are established by means of a structured and valid process within the contextual requirements.
Data is collected, collated, analysed, interpreted and the findings presented, in terms of the contextual requirements.
Consultative processes are facilitated, documented and reported on, as an integral component of the skills development facilitation processes.
Information and advice on skills development issues is presented and aligned with current skills development practices and requirements.
Learning is promoted in line with individual and organisational needs, using appropriate and effective communication techniques.
Learning and development reporting complies with the regulatory requirements of a specific sector education and training authority.
Ethical conduct is displayed through adherence to quality and regulatory practices when compiling learning and development plans and reports.

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
Learning implementation plans are developed, amended to address specific scenarios and aligned with contextual requirements.
Learner needs are established and addressed during resource and delivery planning.
A learning intervention is structured to meet given outcomes and specific contextual requirements.
Resources needed to deliver a learning intervention are sourced in accordance with contextual requirements.
A learning intervention is implemented and documented in accordance with contextual requirements.
Measurement instruments are selected and applied to context specific requirements.
The outcomes achieved through the learning intervention are measured against the needs established and the projected outcomes.
Data collected is collated, analysed and reported on in terms of trends recognised, outcomes achieved and proposals on future improvements.
Ethical conduct is displayed through the adherence to quality practices when planning and delivering learning intervention.

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
Compliance with the statutory environment is evident in the management of learning and development.
Learning and development budgets are controlled in accordance with contextual requirements.
Effective management of learning and development satisfies quality management requirements.
Resource management is carried out in accordance with good practice standards.
Procurement practices and principles are applied in accordance with good governance standards.
Quality assurance is performed and documented, in accordance with policies, procedures and standard documentation.
Ethical conduct is displayed through effective and accurate communication with all stakeholders.

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
Planning of resources and logistics is conducive for efficient and effective learning.
Preparations for the facilitation of learning is aligned to adult learning principles and techniques.
Barriers to learning are dealt with, in the delivery of the learning intervention.
Past experience and prior learning is recognised during the delivery of the learning intervention.
Guidance and support of learners enables them to define outcomes, clarify issues, manage expectations and identify learning paths and opportunities.
The facilitation plan and process are adapted to meet contextual and learning dynamics.
Active learning is facilitated according to contexts and learning styles, by drawing on appropriate learning methodologies.
Facilitation is conducted in an organised manner that ensures the physical and psycho-social safety of the learners.
Learner progress and effectiveness of the intervention is measured continuously and feedback is provided.
The dynamics of the learner group are managed in accordance with contextual requirements.
Stakeholder feedback is reflected upon and is used to inform areas of continuous personal development and improvement.
Ethical and professional practice is displayed when organisational procedures are followed.

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:
Work based learning opportunities in work processes, are identified and aligned with learning outcomes required from the learners (including, but not limited to interns, students, mentees, coaches, employees, and apprentices).
Work based learning is integrated with work processes through collaboration with stakeholders, to ensure minimal disruption.
Learning is formulated as specific learning activities and associated targets and standards through a facilitated, collaborative process.
Learner performance is evaluated and decisions on further development are made in accordance with evaluation reports.
Learning evidence collection methods, tools and instruments are selected to meet contextual requirements.
Documentation and records are completed and maintained in accordance with quality management system requirements.
Interactive coaching sessions are structured, the delivery monitored and feedback evaluated.
Planning of resources and logistics is conducive to efficient and effective learning.
Facilitation of learning is aligned to adult learning principles and techniques.
Barriers to learning are dealt with, in the delivery of the learning intervention.

Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 6:
Principles of good assessment practices are applied within the occupational learning framework.
Evidence collection methods, tools and instruments are evaluated and adapted to meet contextual requirements.
Principles of evidence collection are applied within contextual requirements.
Assessment decisions are made and feedback formulated in accordance with accepted standards and practices.
The domains of reflexive competence is assessed and documented.
Documentation and records are completed and maintained in accordance with quality management system requirements.
Past experience and prior learning is recognised, during the delivery of the learning intervention.
Physical and psycho-social safety of the learners is assured.
Learner progress and effectiveness of the intervention is measured continuously and feedback is provided.

Integrated Assessment:

Integrated formative assessment:
The skills development provider will use the curriculum to guide them on the stipulated internal assessment criteria and weighting. They will also apply the scope of practical skills and applied knowledge as stipulated by the internal assessment criteria. This formative assessment leads to entrance into the integrated external summative assessment.

Integrated summative assessment:

An external integrated summative assessment, conducted through the relevant Quality (Quality Council for Trades and Occupations) QCTO Assessment Quality Partner is required for the issuing of this qualification. The external integrated summative assessment will focus on the exit level outcomes and associated assessment criteria.

INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY

Qualifications and/or programmes from the United Kingdom, Australia and Singapore were selected for comparison. Selected areas of learning included in the qualifications that are comparable to this qualification were extracted and included. The findings are as follows:
United Kingdom:
Two qualifications registered with the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation were selected for comparison.

AIM Awards, Diploma in Education and Training (QCF), Level 5, ID 601/0462/4. AIM Awards is a National Awarding Organisation, offering a large number of regulated qualifications at different levels and in a wide range of subject areas. The Diploma in Education and Training offered by AIM includes learning in the following comparable areas:
Teaching, learning and assessment in education and training.
Theories, principles and models in education and training.
Developing teaching, learning and assessment in education and training.
Delivering employability skills.
Developing learning and development programmes.
Evaluating learning programmes.
Identifying the learning needs of organisations.
Managing learning and development in groups.
Preparing for the coaching role.
Preparing for the mentoring role.

City and Guilds, Certificate in Education and Training (QCF), Level 4, ID 601/0253/6. The Certificate includes learning in the following comparable areas:
Delivering education and training.
Using resources for education and training.
Assessing learners in education and training.
Planning to meet the needs of learners in education and training.
Developing and preparing resources for learning and development.
Developing learning and development programmes.
Identifying individual learning and development needs.
Identifying the learning needs of organisations.
Evaluating learning programmes.
Preparing for the coaching role.
Preparing for the mentoring role.

Australia:
TAE40110, Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, registered by the Australian Qualifications Framework, was selected for comparison to this qualification. The Australian qualification includes the following comparable areas of learning:
Plan assessment activities and processes.
Assess competence.
Participate in assessment validation.
Plan, organise and deliver group-based learning.
Plan, organise and facilitate learning in the workplace.
Design and develop learning programs.
Provide work skill instruction.
Mentor in the workplace.
Maintain training and assessment information.

Singapore:
Singapore’s vocational and technical education has gained much international recognition for its effective training and whole person development. The Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) was established in September 2003 to lead, drive and champion workforce development, enhancing the employability and competitiveness of the workforce of Singapore. The Singapore Workforce Development Agency recognises a 3.5 month Advanced Certificate in Training and Assessment (ACTA).

ACTA requires learners to complete six modules as follows:
M1: Apply Adult Learning Principles in Training.
M2: Design a Learning Experience.
M3: Prepare and Facilitate a Learning Experience.
M4: Interpret the Singapore Workforce Skills Qualifications System.
M5: Assess Competence.
M6: Prepare for Continuing Professional Development.

Conclusion:
The selected countries listed above, as well as a vast number of studies on vocational training and development educator standards, all have a common focus related to the content and scope of qualifications. Key areas of learning identified, to ensure the delivery of quality vocational training programs, are very similar to those included in this qualification. The difference mainly relates to levels of learner achievement, as reflected by Diplomas, Degrees and Postgraduate studies. These include areas of learning such as the design of learning resources, including e-learning systems, the design of curricula and research.

This qualification is comparable with international trends in the training of learning and development practitioners.

ARTICULATION OPTIONS
Systemic Articulation:
Horizontal Articulation:
National Certificate in Generic Management, Level 5, ID: 59201.
Higher Certificate in Human Resource Management, Level 5, ID: 96080.
Higher Education and Training Certificate in Development Practice, Level 5, ID: 23095.
National Diploma in ABET Practice, Level 5, ID: 20159.

Vertical Articulation:
Advanced Certificate in Education, Level 6, ID 20473.
National First Degree in Occupationally Directed Education, Training and Development Practices, Level 6, ID 48871.
National First Degree in ABET Practice, Level 6, ID 20485.

What is meant with Limitations of data interpretation are made explicit

When the “limitations of data interpretation are made explicit,” it means that any constraints, weaknesses, uncertainties, or potential sources of bias in the process of interpreting data are clearly and transparently stated. This is an important practice in research, analysis, and reporting because it helps the audience understand the potential shortcomings of the conclusions drawn from the data. Making limitations explicit demonstrates a commitment to integrity, honesty, and a comprehensive understanding of the data and its context.

Here’s why explicitly stating limitations in data interpretation is important:

  1. Transparency: By acknowledging limitations, you are transparent about the boundaries of your analysis. This builds trust with your audience and helps them better assess the validity of your conclusions.
  2. Credibility: Addressing limitations enhances the credibility of your work. It shows that you’ve critically examined your data and have a nuanced understanding of its potential weaknesses.
  3. Contextualization: Limitations provide context for understanding your findings. Readers can better gauge the applicability and generalizability of your results if they understand the boundaries of your study.
  4. Avoiding Misinterpretation: By pointing out limitations, you can help prevent others from misinterpreting or overgeneralizing your results. This is especially important in complex analyses where there might be subtle nuances that impact interpretation.
  5. Guiding Future Research: Discussing limitations can offer insights into areas for improvement and guide future research efforts. It helps identify potential avenues for refining methods and addressing biases.
  6. Ethical Considerations: Ethical research practice involves being honest about the strengths and weaknesses of your work. Hiding limitations could lead to misinformed decisions or actions based on incomplete or biased data.

Examples of limitations that might be explicitly stated include:

  • Sampling Bias: If the data collected is not representative of the entire population of interest, the potential bias introduced by the sampling method should be acknowledged.
  • Measurement Error: If the accuracy of measurement tools or instruments used in data collection is limited, this could impact the reliability of results.
  • Confounding Variables: If other variables not considered in the analysis could influence the relationship between the variables being studied, it’s important to highlight this potential limitation.
  • Data Quality: If the data used has missing values, inaccuracies, or inconsistencies, these issues should be discussed to indicate potential impact on findings.
  • External Validity: If the study was conducted in a specific context that might not generalize to other settings, this should be noted.
  • Limitations in Analysis Methods: If the chosen analysis methods have constraints or assumptions that might affect the conclusions, these should be explained.

In summary, explicitly addressing the limitations of data interpretation involves openly acknowledging any weaknesses, biases, or uncertainties in your analysis and conclusions. This practice contributes to the overall rigor and integrity of research and analysis.

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Explain the methods of identifying trends, patterns, and comparisons with learning interventions.

Identifying trends, patterns, and making comparisons in the context of learning interventions involves analyzing data to uncover meaningful insights that can inform decision-making, program improvements, and future strategies. Here are several methods and techniques used to identify trends, patterns, and comparisons in learning interventions:

  1. Descriptive Statistics: Utilize basic descriptive statistics such as mean, median, mode, range, and standard deviation to summarize and describe the central tendencies and variability of quantitative data.
  2. Graphs and Charts: Create visual representations like bar graphs, line charts, scatter plots, and histograms to visually identify trends and patterns in data distribution.
  3. Time Series Analysis: Analyze data collected over time to identify temporal trends, seasonality, and patterns that may emerge over different periods of the learning intervention.
  4. Comparative Analysis: Compare data from different groups, cohorts, or time periods to identify variations, differences, and similarities in outcomes, engagement levels, and performance.
  5. Correlation Analysis: Determine the strength and direction of relationships between two or more variables using correlation coefficients. This helps identify associations and dependencies.
  6. Regression Analysis: Use regression analysis to understand how one variable (dependent variable) may be influenced by one or more other variables (independent variables).
  7. Cluster Analysis: Employ cluster analysis to group participants with similar characteristics or behaviors. This can help identify distinct participant segments or learning patterns.
  8. Factor Analysis: Use factor analysis to identify underlying factors or constructs that contribute to observed patterns in participants’ responses.
  9. Content Analysis: Analyze qualitative data, such as open-ended survey responses or participant reflections, to identify recurring themes, sentiments, and patterns in participants’ narratives.
  10. Pattern Recognition: Develop algorithms or models to automatically identify patterns, such as learning paths, interactions, or behaviors, from large datasets.
  11. ANOVA (Analysis of Variance): Use ANOVA to compare means across multiple groups and determine if there are statistically significant differences among them.
  12. Chi-Square Test: Apply the chi-square test to compare the distribution of categorical variables and assess whether observed differences are statistically significant.
  13. Data Visualization Tools: Utilize data visualization tools and software to create interactive dashboards and visualizations that allow for dynamic exploration of trends and patterns.
  14. Participant Segmentation: Segment participants into groups based on specific characteristics, behaviors, or outcomes. This allows for targeted analysis and comparisons.
  15. Qualitative Coding: In qualitative data, use coding techniques to categorize and label responses, facilitating the identification of recurring themes and patterns.
  16. Comparative Case Studies: Conduct in-depth case studies of different groups or cohorts to understand their unique experiences, challenges, and outcomes.
  17. Cross-Tabulations: Create cross-tabulation tables to analyze relationships between two or more categorical variables and identify patterns or dependencies.
  18. Learning Analytics Platforms: Leverage learning analytics platforms to automatically analyze and visualize learning data, revealing insights into engagement, progress, and learning paths.
  19. Text Mining: Employ text mining techniques to extract and analyze insights from large volumes of unstructured textual data, such as participant feedback or discussions.
  20. Statistical Software: Use statistical software packages like SPSS, R, or Python to perform advanced analyses and identify trends, patterns, and comparisons.

By using these methods, educators, evaluators, and instructional designers can uncover valuable insights that inform decision-making, drive program improvements, and enhance the effectiveness of learning interventions.

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What is the elements of data collection when it comes to compiling an evaluation report?

Compiling an evaluation report involves collecting various elements of data to provide a comprehensive and well-informed assessment of the subject being evaluated. The specific elements of data collection can vary depending on the nature of the evaluation (e.g., program evaluation, product evaluation, performance evaluation) and the goals of the report. However, here are some common elements of data collection that are often included in an evaluation report:

  1. Purpose and Scope of Evaluation: Clearly define the objectives, goals, and scope of the evaluation. This helps to set the context and expectations for the report.
  2. Background Information: Provide relevant background information about the subject being evaluated. This can include historical context, previous evaluations, and any relevant research or literature.
  3. Data Sources: Identify the sources of data used in the evaluation. These could include surveys, interviews, observations, existing documentation, statistical data, and more.
  4. Data Collection Methods: Describe the methods used to collect data. For example, if surveys were conducted, explain the survey design, sampling methods, and data collection process. If interviews were conducted, detail how participants were selected and interviewed.
  5. Data Collection Tools: Include the actual tools used for data collection, such as survey questionnaires, interview guides, observation protocols, and any standardized instruments.
  6. Data Analysis Techniques: Describe the techniques used to analyze the collected data. This could involve qualitative analysis (e.g., thematic analysis) and quantitative analysis (e.g., statistical analysis).
  7. Data Findings: Present the findings derived from the data analysis. Use charts, graphs, tables, and narrative descriptions to convey the results of the evaluation.
  8. Key Insights and Conclusions: Summarize the main insights and conclusions drawn from the data. Address whether the evaluation’s objectives were met and any unexpected findings that emerged.
  9. Recommendations: If applicable, provide recommendations based on the evaluation findings. These should be actionable and tied to the specific goals of the evaluation.
  10. Limitations: Discuss any limitations of the evaluation process, such as potential biases, data collection challenges, or constraints. Transparency about limitations enhances the report’s credibility.
  11. Lessons Learned: Share insights into the process of conducting the evaluation, highlighting what worked well and what could be improved in future evaluations.
  12. References: Cite all sources, references, and relevant literature that informed the evaluation process and analysis.
  13. Appendices: Include supplementary materials, such as detailed data tables, interview transcripts, survey responses, or any other supporting documentation.
  14. Visual Aids: Incorporate visual aids like graphs, charts, and diagrams to illustrate data trends and patterns effectively.
  15. Executive Summary: Provide a concise summary of the evaluation’s key findings, conclusions, and recommendations. This serves as an overview for readers who might not delve into the full report.

Remember that the elements of data collection should align with the evaluation’s objectives and the specific requirements of the report’s audience. Clear organization, thorough documentation, and effective communication of findings are essential for a successful evaluation report.

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